Anybody who experiences headaches or migraine of any kind will appreciate this post on migraine and shiatsu!

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Nature is so unkind. Not only do women have the sole responsibility for childbirth and monthly menstruation for 30+ years of our lives, but we also suffer from debilitating migraines 3 times more than men. Although young boys may suffer from migraines more often than girls, after puberty approximately 18% of women will exhibit signs of a migraine within their lifetime while only 6% of men experience this painful condition.

Along with a hormonal connection, migraines appear to have a genetic component as well. If one parent suffers from migraines, their child has a 40% chance of experiencing them, too. If both parents exhibit symptoms of migraines, the incidence in their child increases to a staggering 90%!

Migraines differ from normal tension headaches in that pain is normally concentrated on one side of the head and accompanied by a host of other symptoms including light, smell, or sound sensitivities, disturbed…

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just read this blog which starts with ‘skilful communication allows someone to speak from the heart’ really quite impressed by the essay and reading it made me think about how this could be useful in validating emotions.

Epilepsy and fear – Why Shiatsu?

“Transformation happens when we live through the experience of deep fear. Seeing fear as a signal to hide in some realm of safety prevents our connection to what lies behind our self-identity. When we ignore parts of ourselves, or the world, in response to fear, we insist on too small an identity. If we are lucky those ignored parts will come knocking at our door revealing what appears menacing to be actually some part of ourself which we cannot yet accept as our own. “

Bridgette Ludwig Shiatsu Society Journal Autumn 2012

Health problems bring us closer to fear. They remind us we are not immortal.

One problem of living with epilepsy is that there is the fear. The fear of when the next seizure will come. The fear of not waking up.  Spending waking moments wondering about black out or experienceing altered states of consciousness? Fear of loosing control or having no control over the way life opens out. It is hard to plan ahead when there is no guarantee that seizures won’t get in the way.

Coping mechanisms for this type of problem can allow us to carry on and live life to the maximum. Feeling grounded and centred in the body is helpful to remind us that we are ’in our bodies’ rather than ‘out of our bodies’ in the sense of unconscious and disconnected by the experience of living through a seizure.

The power of touch in particular, in this example shiatsu, can bring us back into our bodies and help us to realign with life following disconnection brought about by seizures.

It is important that coping mechanisms don’t become our prison. Change is the essence of moving through and forward through fear.

Without fear there would be no control. We instinctively look to control our lives but is there any control when none of us can be certain what will happen next?

Fear cripples if it is not challenged.

Only when we challenge the fear does it loose its power and therefore the control it has over us.

“The whole secret of existence is to have no fear. Never fear what will become of you, depend on no one. Only the moment you reject all help are you freed.”
Buddha

Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/fear.html#6JqP39s9pl2Qk8SL.99

Shiatsu is a holistic therapy which utilizes healing touch and treats the whole person mind, body and spirit.

Read more about it at:

http://www.shiatsusociety.org/content/about-shiatsu