Paul Mckenna – More Mind Medicine

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/features/paul-mckenna-i-can-make-you-better-8614417.html

I came accross this article in the Independent about how Paul Mckenna is currently using hypnosis techniques to ease trauma and health problems. The journalist said that he had one session with Mckenna and although  he wasn’t ‘Cured’ he slept better and felt more confident driving. He had been traumatized by being run over. He was still a bit sceptical but I thought it wasn’t bad for one session!

Have you ever used hypnosis for health?

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Mind Over Medicine – Lissa Rankin Book Launch

Lissa gave regular readers of her blog the opportunity read the first excerpt of ‘Mind Over Medicine’ by Lissa Rankin MD available to buy from a link on her blog.

I thought that everyone with an interest in healing (themselves or others) would be interested in her book, the subjects talked in the excerpt I read are; The placebo effect and its physiology, spontaneous remission from cancer, healing and belief. That was only a short extract!

Can’t wait to read the whole thing!

http://lissarankin.com/an-eggy-book-launch-happy-birth-day-mind-over-medicine?inf_contact_key=c0c764d605a6c01aaca9c07c0aa6fa3b21abd769dc36d07e70955d70cdb7a98e

Singing for Alzheimer’s and Mysicophilia by Oliver Sacks

 

I recently had cause to dig out my copy of Oliver Sacks book Musicophilia and lend it to a friend, because she has started to volunteer for an organisation that is using singing to help people with Alzheimer’s. This improves memory, health and wellbeing.

For those of you that are interested the Alzheimer’s society project link is very interesting.

http://alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=760 and shows a video of the project and has links explaining what it is.

I know a lot of people who have said sound effects their epilepsy, I found this  newspaper review that explains what Musicophilia has to say about Alzheimers and epilepsy.

If anyone wants to borrow my copy just let me now and I can lend it to you when it gets back to me!

‘Sacks tells some very moving stories about those with terrifyingly profound amnesia, or Alzheimer’s disease, for whom music can “restore them to themselves”. People with aphasia can be taught to speak again through singing. On the other hand, previously healthy people begin to have “musical hallucinations”, blasted by intrusive ghostly music during every waking second; and others have seizures in response to music, or “musicogenic epilepsy” – which, intriguingly, can be selective. One woman Sacks cites “had seizures only in response to ‘modern, dissonant music,’ never in response to classical or romantic music” – and her husband was a composer of the type of music that gave her seizures, which one suspects may be a hint. But such a violent response to certain music might be more common than suspected: “Many people, [one researcher thought], might start to get a queer feeling – disturbing, perhaps frightening – when they heard certain music, but then would immediately retreat from the music, turn it off, or block their ears, so that they did not progress to a full-blown seizure.” Indeed, certain styles of free jazz have always made me physically nauseous.’

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2007/nov/03/scienceandnature.music review Stephen Poole The Guardian Newspaper

How your mind can heal your body – book review

I have been anicipating this post from Holistic yoga with Alyson for some time on the book by http://www.drdavidhamilton.com which I think is a great review of a book about ‘how your mind can heal your body’. Well worth checking out!

Holistic yoga with Alyson

bookcoverOver the winter new year break I received a pile of books from a friend who was having a clear out. One of them I read straight away: How your mind can heal your body by David Hamilton and I’ve meaning to blog about it for months because it’s very interesting, and has implications for our yoga practice, and our whole lives potentially.

At first glance my immediate reaction to the book and its title was ‘what nonsense’, but two things made me change my mind. One was that the title is a bit simplistic as the author does state several times that the mind can help heal the body and people should continue with their conventional medical treatment alongside adopting helpful mind-based approaches. The other reason was the extensive amount of research of human trials that he quotes that back up all his claims.

I think the book’s message…

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The Five Essentials … For Health & Happiness – Guest Blog

I would like to thank fredphillips.wordpress.com for this guest blog post, which shows, that we humans are not so different; and if you ask the universe (or the internet) you will find people out there who you have a lot in common with. 🙂 thanks fred!

There are five things that are essential for our health and happiness. I call these, oddly enough, The Five Essentials. Catchy, eh?

We are in the midst of enormous suffering on the planet. Rates of disease are spiraling upwards. Bullying is an epidemic, especially in our schools.  Regional and domestic conflicts abound. Many magnificent species are disappearing, or at the risk of disappearing, from the planet.

I could go on and regale you with more depressing stuff, but I really don’t want you to stop reading.

The truth is (and I believe this with all my heart), there is a solution to all this misery and it has to do with … you guessed it  … The Five Essentials. So let’s get right to it. Here they are:

  1. To have an awareness of the truths of our existence
  2. To feel good about ourselves
  3. To heal our emotional pain
  4. To eat and drink healthy stuff
  5. To get active

Let’s briefly examine each of these essentials to see what they’re all about. (Yes, I know, a couple of them are rather self evident.)

1. To have an awareness of the truths of our existence:

Understanding the truths of who we really are and why we’re really here on the planet (there is little evidence to suggest it has anything to do with getting rich & famous) is critical if we have any hope of changing human behaviour. It certainly inspired me to change mine. I think if we knew for instance, that we live in oneness with God and everything else that exists, we would not treat each other the way we do. We wouldn’t start wars. We wouldn’t exploit the animal kingdom and we wouldn’t pollute. We would let go of fear. We would live with more compassion and love. We would be more altruistic. And we would be more humble.

If you want to know more, immerse yourself in spirituality. Talk to spiritual people. Read books by Eckhart Tolle, Caroline Myss, Wayne Dyer, Neale Donald Walsch and my own book, The History Teacher. Read my spiritual posts at fredphillips.wordpress.com.

2. To feel good about ourselves:

If we all felt good about ourselves … if we all felt lovable, worthy, good enough and empowered … again, we would not behave the way we do. We would not mistreat others. We would be more kind and forgiving. We would be more honest. We wouldn’t put people out of work. We would eat healthier foods.

If you want to change the way you feel about yourself, just be kind.

3. To heal our emotional pain:

We are a society full of unresolved emotional pain. We are loaded with anger, grief, shame, guilt and resentment. If we have any hope of creating peace on earth (one of the reasons we’re here), we need to release this pain. We need to transform it into something healthier and more positive.

If you want to heal your unresolved emotional pain, forgive who you need to forgive, apologize who you need to apologize to, cry if you need to and when you feel anger, scream into a pillow until you feel better.

4. To eat and drink healthy:

With all due respect to those who earn their living working in the fast food, junk food and processed food industries, if we really want to put an end to cancer and all other forms of disease, we need to eat better. We especially need to drastically reduce our sugar intake and eliminate artificial sweeteners and gmos. Why? Because this stuff acidifies our bodies and weakens our immune systems (80% of our immune system is situated in our gastrointestinal tract), leaving us susceptible to disease.

If you want to do one simple thing to improve your diet and your health, start eating fermented foods, especially, sauerkraut. It will put much needed healthy bacteria in your gut.

5. To get active:

As a whole,  we are far too sedentary and we’re paying a high price for it. Our bodies aren’t fit, leaving us vulnerable to stress and disease. We need to get active. I highly recommend martial arts or yoga, but if you do nothing else, go for a walk every day!

I believe in my heart that having an awareness of these Five Essentials, understanding  them and incorporating them into our daily lives will bring us peace of mind, joyful living and love (sign me up for that). They will bring us happiness (that too)!

The Power of Vulnerability – Brene Brown

I watched this talk this evening and have to admit that I laughed, probably a bit too loudly, through this very touching Ted talk re-blogged by Dr Frank Lipman.  I have seen it before from Be Well and Happy.

For all my fellow onions out there, I think this is a really important and not often enough discussed topic which has cropped up a lot recently (see links).

For everyone  this weekend please share Brene’s Talk  on vulnerability as an idea worth spreading.

 

http://bewellandhappy.wordpress.com/2013/01/10/brene-brown-ted-talk-on-vulnerability/

http://www.drfranklipman.com/brene-brown-the-power-of-vulnerability/

http://fredphillips.wordpress.com/2013/02/27/the-beauty-and-benefits-of-vulnerability/

Britons beware of changes to the NHS. A Time Magazine article on the problems with private health care accross the pond.

Health & Family

Corrections Appended: February 26, 2013

1. Routine Care, Unforgettable Bills
When Sean Recchi, a 42-year-old from Lancaster, Ohio, was told last March that he had non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, his wife Stephanie knew she had to get him to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Stephanie’s father had been treated there 10 years earlier, and she and her family credited the doctors and nurses at MD Anderson with extending his life by at least eight years.

Because Stephanie and her husband had recently started their own small technology business, they were unable to buy comprehensive health insurance. For $469 a month, or about 20% of their income, they had been able to get only a policy that covered just $2,000 per day of any hospital costs. “We don’t take that kind of discount insurance,” said the woman at MD Anderson when Stephanie called to make an appointment for Sean.

Stephanie was then…

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Karate and Neurogenesis – Articles by Rob Nielson

Following through with the theme of neurogenesis and exercise for brain health and development; here are links to two excellent articles by program director and chief instructor of karate Rob Nielson at Cedar Ridge Academy Therapeutic Boarding school for troubled teens (1).

Karate is one of my favourite pass-times and I was very happy to read that it is being used in such a positive way to help young people.

1) Karate Black Belt Challenge Brain Development in troubled teens

Student Participation stimulates brain development (neurogenesis)

By Rob Nielson, Program Director & Chief Instructor

Helpful in disorders like Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), anxiety and depression. Increases self-confidence and mindfulness,

http://www.cedaridge.net/karate-black-belt-challenge.html

2) Karate Black Belt Challenge for brain development in troubled teens – Part II

an Holistic approach to therapy at Cedar Ridge
Academy Therapeutic Boarding School for troubled teens

by Rob Nielson, Program Director & Chief Instructor

Relationships between being physically fit and mentally fit, karate for attention deficit, anxiety, drug issues, impulse control, aerobic exercise and brain health.

http://www.cedaridge.net/black-belt-challenge-therapy.html

 

1) http://www.cedaridge.net/quick-facts.html

Epilepsy and Exercise Study and Epilepsy at the Olympics – ‘Exercise is good for the brain and the heart, and everything else’ Dr. Elinor Ben-Menachem from Göteborg University.

This week I was listening to the ETP (1) blog cast and was really inspired by the post on the work of DR Elinor Ben-Menachem on her project on exercise and epilepsy as discussed with Dr Joseph Sirven.(2)

Topics discussed:

Raising seizure threshold by exercising more.  Low cardiovascular fitness related to 79% higher risk of developing epilepsy after age 18.

Exploring the importance of exercise before the age of 18 in the importance of prevention of health problems in later life, including epilepsy. The possibility that exercise may be an inexpensive way of managing seizures is also mentioned.

Her message is that exercise is ‘good for the brain and the heart, and everything else’.

Full transcript (3)

Also of interest Dr Ben-Menachem’s Hot Topics Symposium Modulators of Epilepsy:  The Influence of Lifestyle and Environmental Factors (4)

This research presentation is interesting because it covers neuroplasticity, the hippocampus, the role of exercise in preventing central nervous system diseases, cardiovascular fitness and the future risk of epilepsy. Hormones are also discussed. The Hypothalamic Pituitary Testes and Ovarian axis is covered, together with progesterone treatment trial.

The hypothesis is: cardiovascular fitness could modulate brain plasticity by increasing amounts of circulating growth factors or beta endorphins or some other neuroactive molecule.

Dr Ben-Menachem discusses the Olympic silver medallist cyclist Marion Clignet (5) who was not allowed to race for America at the Olympics so she cycled for France instead. Marion has written a book called ‘Tenacious’ with a fellow sportsman yachtsman Benjamin Hovey who also has epilepsy see here (6) (7)

Further athletes with epilepsy at the Olympics can be found at (8) The Epilepsy Institute of North Carolina blog. Worthy of note in this blog post:

‘Dai Greene played football (soccer for us since he’s British) when he was a teenager.  He had to quit playing soccer in his late teens due to a growing spurt that causes knee pain.  It is called Osgood Schlatter Disease.  He now runs the 400m hurdler for Welsh and Great Britain.   Dai had his first seizure at seventeen.  He doesn’t take any medication; instead he doesn’t drink any alcohol and makes sure he gets the right amount of sleep needed.  Several medals have been won and he will be Captain for the Great British Athletics Team.’

This is very promising from the point of view of the possibilities of using alternative means to control seizures and giving people options beyond medication.

Dr Ben-Menachem has also written a book called Case Studies in Epilepsy (Case Studies in Neurology) [Kindle Edition] (9) This book looks very interesting and although it is out of my price range the initial ‘look inside’ was very promising so if you can find it at a library resource it may be very useful.

Dr Ben-Menachem covers barriers that prevent people with epilepsy from exercising such as; over protection, social isolation, low self-esteem, anxiety and depression. She mentions that weight can be a problem.

I would add one other problem area facing people with epilepsy and exercise which is ‘stigma’; either because of society, weather it is because of lack of understanding of epilepsy or ignorance of what epilepsy is and that it is important to exercise no matter what the health problem.

Exercising in groups is recommended.

Some useful strategies for safely exercising with epilepsy are covered in this blog post from Rosewinelover epilepsy action media volunteer;

http://rosewinelover.com/2013/01/04/epilepsy-and-fitness-resolutions-for-2013/

For myself I can say that without exercise my personal seizure management is extremely challenging because I experience so many positive benefits from exercising. (10)

Happy Exercising Everybody!

1)http://www.epilepsy.com/epilepsy/hallway_2013_podcasts?utm_source=Epilepsy+Therapy+Project&utm_campaign=535342f2b3-Epilepsy_News_2_20_13&utm_medium=email

Epilepsy Therapy Project

2) http://www.gu.se/english/about_the_university/staff/?languageId=100001&userId=6850

3) http://professionals.epilepsy.com/pdfs/Exercise%20and%20Epilepsy%20-%20HC%20-%201_9_13.pdf Epilepsy Therapy Project Blogcast Transcript

4) http://www.hope4harper.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/The-Influence-of-Lifestyle-and-Environmental-Factors.pdf

5) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_Clignet

6) http://marionclignet.com/

7)http://marionclignet.com/tenacious

8) http://epilepsyinstitute.blogspot.co.uk/2012/07/epilepsy-and-olympics.html

9) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Case-Studies-Epilepsy-Neurology-ebook/dp/B00A8GYWBO

Case Studies in Epilepsy (Case Studies in Neurology) [Kindle Edition] Hermann Stefan (Author, Editor), Elinor Ben-Menachem (Author, Editor),Patrick Chauvel (Author, Editor), Renzo Guerrini (Editor)

10) https://epilepsymeandneurology.wordpress.com/2012/12/26/what-do-epilepsy-autism-hormones-sleep-music-meditation-exercise-have-in-common-the-hippocampus-and-neurogenesis/

How do beliefs interfere with and prevent recovery? Is there a happily ever after to your fairy story?

I have been recovering from epilepsy for a long time and have become interested in reading a great deal about belief in relation to health and wellbeing. Other bloggers have touched on it recently, for example an excellent post from the http://workitwell.wordpress.com/2013/01/18/what-are-your-core-beliefs/

was titled ‘what are your core beliefs’.

Belief is a big word with few letters. Thinking about it might bring up ideas about your-self, others, religion, believing in something not believing in something, maybe even right and wrong.

So at what stage in your life did you start asking questions about the tooth fairy and Santa Clause?

Why do we believe what we believe and at what point do we begin to ask questions about these beliefs?

In the context of religion for example, asking questions about faith could be a welcome part of the discussion within a place of worship. Spiritual leaders may encourage debate about beliefs and use them as an opportunity to Shepard their flock to safer pastures.

However examples of how much resistance has been encountered in relation to changing beliefs can be found throughout history.

One such example of this would be the geocentric model (1) of the earth as the centre of the universe, and the resistance faced by Galileo Galilei (2) when he tried to present his case that things might be different.

Without reconsidering and changing beliefs such as the Earth as the centre of the universe, humans may never have made it to the moon. We could still be trying to leave the ground instead of taking into account new physics to take us upwards on an evolutionary path towards new technologies.

Can you imagine what would have happened if Galileo had suggested that you could communicate with people the other side of the world on an electric light box?

Bearing this in mind, how difficult is it for us to challenge or own beliefs and those held by people who are charged with our health care?

This type of difficulty is well illustrated by the distressing experience of Well Call me crazy here:

http://wellcallmecrazy.wordpress.com/2013/02/16/the-irony-of-it-all/

Having had experience of how difficult it can be to hold the ‘reflective mirror’ up to myself at what point do you question the beliefs of your doctors?

It is a sad fact that the men in white coats are often given great power by us. We look to them to answer our health problems but sadly don’t question their fallibility, and even if we do we can easily be put off by the sheer dazzling power of the white coat complex.

‘With great power comes great responsibility’ (star wars), which is sadly often abused. Pharmacy is big business and there are many millions of billions of motivations why modern medical culture doesn’t encourage us to ask questions about what is in our medication, how does it work, and what is it doing to the body?(3)

Great strides have been made by modern medicine in the mechanistic understanding of the body and yet the deities charged with our health care are only human. Why do we not ALWAYS ask what are you putting into my body?

A lot of people like my-self may have had the experience of being told that they would be on medication for life and that they need to be cured.

I prescribed to this belief for many years, despite experiencing side effects that were detrimental to my health and emotional wellbeing. This belief was driven simply by the fact that I thought my doctors new best. As a result of taking medication without question I didn’t get any better and ended up with significantly more health problems as a result.

I can’t remember exactly when I began to question the men in white coats, but I can remember that it was after I began to seek help from a white coat who went against the grain and decided to reduce my medication. The problem was it was turning me into a zombie – and zombies defiantly don’t think for themselves or ask questions.

My white coat was actually not convinced that I was epileptic at the time, so although I have to give him some credit for removing the medication it wasn’t because he had acknowledged that I am epileptic; although this did change once he had removed enough medication to find my EEG.

Whilst alternative therapies continue to be held up as many things (including the last resort for patients such as myself) there are a number of common denominators that I feel are important to mention.

The power of belief.

I have been following the work of Lissa Rankin MD.(4) You may have seen her TedX talk which I have posted at the bottom of the page. The placebo and nocebo effects are covered and Lissa speaks about the work of the institute of noetic Sciences (5) spontaneous remission project.(6)

Lissa’s blog has recently run a 4 part series http://lissarankin.com/is-it-your-fault-if-you-cant-heal-yourself-part-1 which asks is it your fault if you can’t heal yourself? This question in particular is relevant to recovery from ill health and was sparked as a result of the suggestion that we perhaps may be able to heal ourselves without medication and/or despite it.

Lissa’s work is an encouraging step towards introducing the notion that the body and mind may be intrinsically woven together in a more complex way than is currently outlined by modern Big Pharma medicine.

Would now be an appropriate time for Western medicine to start asking questions about how the mind is woven into the fabric of the body? Or is it too much of an expensive and painful prescription to swallow for Big pharma?

For me I it is not too late. I have had the lights turned on. The fog has lifted, and now I can ask questions.

For years I have been labouring under the impression I can’t learn, but last year I went to college and got 88%, 84% and 69% in exams in the same month as having seizures all month. I have spent this week twitching and seizing but I can still think.

The question had to be how?

All the time I couldn’t think I believed it was because I have epilepsy.

Now I have come to the conclusion that this isn’t so. I couldn’t think because I was on vast quantities of mind bending prescription medications.

I have had to address my core beliefs.

It has been very challenging and I still haven’t had time to integrate this new view of myself into my mind and body.

Socially epilepsy can be a very stigmatising health problem to experience. My experience has made me question how much society, attitudes, and beliefs play a part in recovery.

Thankfully I feel like I have been given a second chance. Realising that I can think and study has meant that I can go back to college to study with the support of my family.

Maybe one day we will all believe that the body, mind and environment are linked and that they are all as necessary for health as each other; just like we can now see we are only a small planet in a solar system in a universe that doesn’t revolve around us – or does it?

This post below illustrates how a different world view can influence recovery, and how diet is important to blood chemistry.

http://freeupliftingbooksonline.wordpress.com/2013/02/15/cup-of-green-juice-for-life-eating-light-with-michiyo-mori/

Why do we consistently reach for pills when diet can be so powerful?

It is sad to think that so many people may never know who they are without medication. I am glad that I found out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=LWQfe__fNbs

Lissa Rankin MD TEDX

1)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geocentric_model#Historical_positions_of_the_Roman_Catholic_hierarchy  Geocentric model

2) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_affair

3)http://www.alternet.org/story/147318/100,000_americans_die_each_year_from_prescription_drugs,_while_pharma_companies_get_rich

4) http://lissarankin.com/is-it-your-fault-if-you-cant-heal-yourself-part-1

5)http://noetic.org/library/publication-books/spontaneous-remission-annotated-bibliography/

6)http://noetic.org/research/program/consciousness-healing/