Get Plugged Into Earth – Thanks Anne!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01r5s20/Ramblings_Series_23_Michael_Weltike_Barefoot_Walker/

Thanks to my chi-gung  teacher for sending this link to aBBC radio barefoot walk and talk about the benefits of barefoot walking.

How to be more grounded with these steps :

Take of your shoes and socks, walk on the ground outside, OBSERVE how you feel when your feet are on the ground!

Simple, and free!

We live on a big round  Earth! 🙂

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GREAT parkinson’s neuro recovery blog!

Kaitlyn Roland

This week kicked off brain awareness week… and the people over at sharpbrains.com debunked 10 myths around brain fitness… here are my 5 favourites!

Myth 1. Genes deter­mine the fate of our brains.

Fact: Life­long brain plas­tic­ity means that our lifestyles and behav­iors play a sig­nif­i­cant role in how our brains (and there­fore our minds) phys­i­cally evolve.

(we have some aspect of control and can create new neural pathways – say with exercise for brain change!)


Myth 3. Med­ica­tion is the main hope for cog­ni­tive health and enhance­ment.
Fact: Non-invasive inter­ven­tions can have com­pa­ra­ble and more durable ben­e­fits, and are also free of side effects.

(drug side effects are not necessary, but side effects – like endorphins – from exercise are encouraged!)

Myth 4. There’s noth­ing we can do to beat Alzheimer’s dis­ease and cog­ni­tive decline.
Fact: While noth­ing has been shown to pre­vent the pathol­ogy of Alzheimer ’s…

View original post 162 more words

Neurological Rock Stars 4 – Dai Greene Captain GB Athletics Team

http://www.epilepsysociety.org.uk/WhatWeDo/News/DaiGreenecaptainsGBteam

I came across this piece in epilepsy society about Dai Greene, a fellow welsh person and his inspiring athletics career. His career in athletics  has assisted him to manage his seizures without medication.

There is a link to an interview with Dai Greene in Epilepsy Review issue 2 2011.

He talks about combating common problems with epilepsy by health, lifestyle and sleep management.

He talks about the differences between his seizure management and his brother who also has epilepsy.

Really impressive and inspiring story!

Advice call after epilepsy drug Epilim study – Epilepsy Care In Wales BBC News

In the wake of the withdrawal of legal aid in the ‘Families who were pursuing a legal case against the makers of an epilepsy drug have dropped their action because legal aid was withdrawn’ BBC News January 20th 2011

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-21523434 London reporting on Pregnant women ‘unaware’ of epilepsy drug risks 25th February 2013, BBC Wales are now reporting:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-12242857

“Campaigner Nicole Crosby-McKenna, from Epilepsy Action, wants the Welsh government to review the way information is conveyed to pregnant patients in Wales.

She said: “We would like to know, if they haven’t got access to an epilepsy specialist nurse, who is giving the women that information? Are the GPs passing the information on to women? And also, do the GPs have enough specialist knowledge to accurately give them pre-conception counselling?”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-21733153

See BBC news links for full details.

Epilepsy, the National Health Service and the post code lottery – A Tale of Two, or Three or Many Postcodes

I have had some time to think about writing this post. It was sparked by my fellow bloggers post about the loss of her epilepsy nurse (1).

I do not have an epilepsy nurse. I had to put up quite a fight to keep my consultant neurologist.

First I would like to say thank you to my Consultant Neurologist and to my GP Doctors medical practice. I would like to say thank-you, you are all great and you are all doing the best you can in what appears to be increasingly difficult conditions in relation to funding health services in the UK.

But in relation to access to health care for epilepsy, this is my story.

As a child with epilepsy I saw my consultant pediatrician and was assigned to him until my 18th year when I finally became an adult under UK health provision.

He tended to my health care needs and oversaw my prescription medication. He was a lovely man and I was sad to hear he has now passed away.

I encountered the biggest problems with seizures whilst I was at college in my late teens and early 20’s. I had moved away from my home hospital in Wales and after a couple of years ended up in England.

There did not seem to be any plan for who would oversee my medication and epilepsy care. I think on reflection that this was at a time when there were no National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for epilepsy care (2)(3) in the UK. Through organisations like Epilepsy Action (4) awareness of the importance of epilepsy care has also grown amongst health care professionals.

My GP (General Practitioner) in England was in charge of my medication and decided to change it. The change was made (as it always is) in my best interests. When I had a significant deterioration in seizure control because of the new medication it took 2 years for me to be assigned to a Consultant Neurologist in a different county in England.

England has different health care arrangements by different County’s much like Wales, but these shift depending on where the specialist services are located.

The consultant who I was assigned to was an expert in his field, but he had a LOT of patients and not a lot of time for me. This experience was not a positive one.

I moved from one county in England to another county, and despite significant problems with seizures there really wasn’t much help from my then neurologist because he just gave me more and more medication which didn’t work.

It is difficult not to want to apportion blame, but I have come to the conclusion that when things go wrong rather than being one person’s fault it is in fact a huge system failure that by and large results in poor health care.

I think that medication is seen as the cheapest option and therefore, for a lot of people the only one.

Finally after some years, my GP decided to take action and referred me to a new Neurologist. This is the one I see to this day. I hold him in high esteem and think he is very thorough. He does listen to me, even though we have differences in opinion.

The problem with this was we had to start from scratch.

He left no stone unturned in the search for my brain squiggles (EEG), and although it took years for him to confirm that I am indeed epileptic, at least I now have closure on this. It made me highly anxious that there may have been some possibility that I could have a brain tumour, scar or be so deeply troubled that I might be able to lose consciousness and go blue and have convulsions all by myself. Then there were the lights, headaches, myoclonic jerks and medication side effects as well as partial seizures.

I could access the epilepsy nurse under my Neurological Consultant in England.

I will never be able to thank my neurologist enough for removing most of my medication.

I can now think.

But it wasn’t over there.

I am now back in Wales and continued to see my neurologist in England without any problems for several years. I did not have an epilepsy nurse, but that didn’t matter so much because I was assigned to a specialist neurologist.

Then the local health board was re-arranged to create a different funding structure a few years ago.

The county where I live does not have a Specialist Consultant Neurologist for Epilepsy or Epilepsy Nurse.

One day I got a letter from the hospital in England saying that my health board were no longer going to pay for my neurological consultations.

This decision had been taken by the local health board without assigning me to a Consultant Epilepsy Neurologist in Wales, or Consulting my General Practitioner or my consultant neurologist in England.

I was absolutely furious. I made a complaint with the help of an NHS Advocate.

I was not able to see my consultant for a year.

It took the health board that long to work out that they would have to pay for me to see a Consultant Neurologist in Wales if they did not continue to fund my trips to England.

As part of my complaint I asked the health board to tell me what they planned to do about access to epilepsy services in Wales.

Then there was a change in Government.

I am now deeply troubled by the current government’s ideas about private health care. (5)(6)

My health has suffered because there was not a joined up service. Under the new proposals, the NHS would be more open to private companies and further fragmentation.

I have seen how private companies and fragmentation has negatively affected the welfare state in Britain.

I find it deeply troubling that more and more people not just with epilepsy but with other health problems will fall through the gaps or face charges for care when there is no money.

If your health is poor you can’t work.

I feel like I have to do all the health care work for myself.

I still don’t have an epilepsy nurse.

In comparison to some countries I obviously feel grateful to have health care at all.

This is not everyone’s experience of epilepsy care in Britain, but it is mine.

1) http://rosewinelover.com/2013/02/25/you-wont-be-seeing-frank-any-more-hes-no-longer-here/

2)http://publications.nice.org.uk/the-epilepsies-the-diagnosis-and-management-of-the-epilepsies-in-adults-and-children-in-primary-and-cg137

3)http://publications.nice.org.uk/the-epilepsies-the-diagnosis-and-management-of-the-epilepsies-in-adults-and-children-in-primary-and-cg137/key-priorities-for-implementation#management

4) Epilepsy Action http://www.epilepsy.org.uk/

5) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-21649307

6) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-21703667

Coconut oil for dementia and alzheimers disease – Natural News.com

http://www.naturalnews.com/039388_coconut_oil_dementia_Alzheimers_disease.html

Really interesting information about coconut oil and inflammation caused by oxidative stress in the brain.

Thanks to which ever blogger it was that put up a link to Nautral News – I can’t find the origional link but thanks and please identify yourself to me so I can credit you!

Neurological Rock Stars 3 – Epilepsy Therapy Project

http://www.epilepsy.com/newsletter/feb13/cc_dietary_therapy?utm_source=Epilepsy+Therapy+Project&utm_campaign=8077df411a-Epilepsy_News_2_27_13&utm_medium=email

Whether or not you are new to epilepsy The Epilepsy Therapy Project is a great resource which provides an all round look at epilepsy, medication, mind, body and diet (even spirit 🙂 although possibly not the alcoholic type which will interfere with medications ).

In terms of information resources the latest newsletter focuses heavily on epilepsy diet and so I have posted the article by Patricia Osborne Shafer RN, MN Resource Specialist, epilepsy.com. It is a very good article about Modified Atkins Diet for epilepsy as a successful story of an alternative to drug based treatment or in conjunction with medication.

Additionally, in the same Newsletter is an equally valid an interesting post on Modified Atkins Diet in Children:

http://www.epilepsy.com/newsletter/feb13/modified_atkins_dre?utm_source=Epilepsy+Therapy+Project&utm_campaign=8077df411a-Epilepsy_News_2_27_13&utm_medium=email

Similar therapies are the Ketogenic diet resources to be found at these links:

http://www.google.com/cse?cx=005246551797440562563:wb-yegiey0w&q=ketogenic%20diet%20epilepsy&oq=keto&gs_l=partner.3.0.0l10j34.688606.689292.0.692368.4.4.0.0.0.0.97.337.4.4.0.gsnos%2Cn%3D13.1.0.0.2449j3313169j5..1ac.1.Q7dWzb3EYz4#gsc.tab=0&gsc.q=ketogenic%20diet%20epilepsy&gsc.page=1

You can sign up for the Epilepsy Therapy Project newsletter to be sent straight to your email account.

The information on diet for epilepsy may shed light on why if you like me are epileptic you may have difficulty going to straight vegetarian or vegan diet (although if you have experience of success with either of these and epilepsy I would love to hear from you).

http://www.epilepsy.org.uk/info Epilepsy Action Provide information and advice about epilepsy in the UK

THANK YOU ONCE AGAIN Epilepsy Therapy Project!

Neurological Rock Stars 2 – Parkinson’s Nautrally blog by Fred Phillips

http://fredphillips.wordpress.com/articles/healing-parkinsons-disease-naturally/#comment-615

Please follow the link to Fred Phillips Blog, and inspiring story of treating parkinson’s nautrally. Fred has taken the time and care to write about how he is using diet, yoga, meditation and emotional healing to treat his Parkinson’s disease symptoms.

His diet advice in particular in relation to inflammation and the relationship between gut and immune system function are really useful (to me especially! 🙂 ).

Fred has a very good understanding of the physiology of the body and how it all inter-relates.

Fred has also written a book about healing.

Fred is also a KARATE TEACHER!!! 🙂

 

Karate and Neurogenesis – Articles by Rob Nielson

Following through with the theme of neurogenesis and exercise for brain health and development; here are links to two excellent articles by program director and chief instructor of karate Rob Nielson at Cedar Ridge Academy Therapeutic Boarding school for troubled teens (1).

Karate is one of my favourite pass-times and I was very happy to read that it is being used in such a positive way to help young people.

1) Karate Black Belt Challenge Brain Development in troubled teens

Student Participation stimulates brain development (neurogenesis)

By Rob Nielson, Program Director & Chief Instructor

Helpful in disorders like Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), anxiety and depression. Increases self-confidence and mindfulness,

http://www.cedaridge.net/karate-black-belt-challenge.html

2) Karate Black Belt Challenge for brain development in troubled teens – Part II

an Holistic approach to therapy at Cedar Ridge
Academy Therapeutic Boarding School for troubled teens

by Rob Nielson, Program Director & Chief Instructor

Relationships between being physically fit and mentally fit, karate for attention deficit, anxiety, drug issues, impulse control, aerobic exercise and brain health.

http://www.cedaridge.net/black-belt-challenge-therapy.html

 

1) http://www.cedaridge.net/quick-facts.html

Neurological Rock Stars – Robert Sarpolsky

Some time ago YouTube started spitting lectures about human behaviour at me by this bloke called ‘Robert Sarpolsky’. (1)

Robert Sarplosky is a lecturer at Stanford University in the US.

In the interests of science I decided to investigate and watch.

Initially, I was really stuck by the ‘Slash’ hairdo (of Gun’s N’ Roses fame) with a beard for intellectual credibility. What really struck me was this curly chimp lover’s quirky teaching style.

Neurology and behaviour shouldn’t be so interesting, but he manages to make what could be a series of lectures that make as much sense as ‘Lost’ and go way over Kiefer Sutherland’s ‘24’ hours of viewing REALLY interesting and valuable time spent.

The lectures that are available to watch are Stanford’s Human Behavioural Biology Module from 2010.(2)

Personally, I find them gripping and if you are also interested in this kind of thing then all 25 lectures are available to watch online.

One of the benefits of this course is that if like me you do not have the kind of background and finances that can get you a place at Stanford, the online lectures are the closest you or I will ever get to this world class course.

Sarpolsky cover’s human behavioural biology in a way that is really broad. The first lecture mentions some of the reading list recommendations such as ‘Chaos: Making A New Science’ the best-selling book by James Gleick that first introduced the principles and early development of chaos theory to the public.(4) Apparently reading this could be so life transforming ‘you may never need to meditate again’ I quote.

What I like about the way the subject is presented is that as the introduction of chaos theory suggests, the course content is diverse. The subjects may be viewed separately, but once they are woven together this is the first time I have seen a full western science course try to piece together human behavior and neurology in a way that acknowledges everything is interconnected.

I have to warn you that although the course is a GREAT deal more interesting and makes more sense than ‘Lost’ I still haven’t finished watching all of the lectures and need to go away and do a PHD on every single one, but for those fortunate to have PHD in genetics, or biology, neuroscience or even if you like me went to the university of ‘life’ this is a really challenging and rewarding series. Don’t be put off by the titles just get stuck in.

It covers topics like, evolutionary behavior, molecular genetics, area’s of the brain, schizophrenia and neuroscience. Perhaps just grazing through them will give you an idea of their flavour.

Anyone who wants to have a look at Sarpolsky’s work in a more accessible way, check out ‘Stress, Portrait of a killer’ documentary 2008. (4)

Human behaviour can be baffling, but you may never need to get lost in ‘Lost’ again.

 

1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Sapolsky#Books

2) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNnIGh9g6fA

3) http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=fvwp&v=_KVWidu_sWo&NR=1

4) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYG0ZuTv5rs&feature=endscreen&NR=1