A video that will give you hope in the next generation

Trenton and Lindsay Cochran on caring and muscular dystrophy

TED Blog

Walt Cochran, a teacher in Kansas City, shared this touching video with us for Education Week about his children — one disabled, one not — who make you think about the depth of the sibling relationship. Lindsay, 10, suffers from a form of Muscular Dystrophy called Spinal Muscular Atrophy and has been in a wheelchair since she was 2 years old. Meanwhile her older brother Trent, 12, sees his role as not just protective older brother, but as an ambassador to remind others that kids with disabilities can do anything they put their mind to with the help of technology and support of loving relationships. Really, we dare you not to shed a tear while watching this.

This video feels especially relevant today given a comment we noticed on John Legend’s performance of “True Colors,” from Caroline Playle, who gave a talk at TEDxKingsCollege. She writes, “This just made me…

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Mind Over Medicine – Lissa Rankin Book Launch

Lissa gave regular readers of her blog the opportunity read the first excerpt of ‘Mind Over Medicine’ by Lissa Rankin MD available to buy from a link on her blog.

I thought that everyone with an interest in healing (themselves or others) would be interested in her book, the subjects talked in the excerpt I read are; The placebo effect and its physiology, spontaneous remission from cancer, healing and belief. That was only a short extract!

Can’t wait to read the whole thing!

http://lissarankin.com/an-eggy-book-launch-happy-birth-day-mind-over-medicine?inf_contact_key=c0c764d605a6c01aaca9c07c0aa6fa3b21abd769dc36d07e70955d70cdb7a98e

What The Bleep Is Neurofeedback You Ask?

more insights into Neurofeedback, not just for robots!

WELL CALL ME CRAZY

 

I have been wanting…..okay attempting…..to write a post about the internship I was doing in neurotherapy. Specifically, a post that would explain what neurofeedback is and its use in treating brain disorders of any kind. The post would be easy to understand, comprehensive without being overwhelming, with a bit of humor thrown in for good measure. I was on draft number four of writing said post when a peer emailed me the article below and I thought, “Wow,this guy just took the words right out of my mouth…..and did it better than what I was imagining!” So, of course I have to share it with all of you. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did and that it spurs you on to learn more and share with others.

 

 

Neurofeedback: Alternative Health Care for Robots?

 

by John Anderson, M.A

 
Many people interested in…

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Epilepsy Research Is Getting Cool So Your Brain Isn’t Smoki’n!

http://www.epilepsy.com/newsletter/may13/brain_cooling?utm_source=Epilepsy+Therapy+Project&utm_campaign=bc6a33ff69-Epilepsy_News_5_1_13&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_cf0feb6500-bc6a33ff69-12439845

Following in the brain cooling tips of ‘The Lazarus Effect’(1) for cardiac arrest Dr Sirven of ETP (see link above) this week gives us the lowdown on brain cooling research for epilepsy treatment.

This excerpt says:

‘In the early view version of the journal, Epilepsia, Drs. Motamedi and colleagues from the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology at Georgetown University School of Medicine present a critical review and opinion article. It is known that brain cooling, otherwise known as therapeutic brain hypothermia, is already a standard of care for a condition such as cardiac arrest in adults, or in neonates in the situation of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. However, there has been an increasing number of research papers that have looked at the concept of utilizing hypothermia to help control seizures that might be used as part of an implantable device to cool the brain in a specific region. In this well written review, Drs. Motamedi and colleagues discuss research innovations in developing cooling as a viable option for the treatment of drug resistant epilepsy.’

So should we all be booking holidays in Iceland or heading for our refrigerator’s frozen broccoli and bags of peas to get out of the heat?

Well it is a bit soon to tell, but as this article from Kaitllyn Roland (2) emphasises the importance of being sensible about the type of exercise you do, and how to take care about body temperature in particular if you are prone to seizures.

I for one won’t be booking my trip to Spain in the middle of August or trying to navigate the Sahara desert, but everyone has their limits!

I hope this article finds you chilling out with some sunny weather keeping cool in the shade, spring may have finally arrived in the UK, or is it our summer?. 🙂

1) https://epilepsymeandneurology.wordpress.com/2013/04/26/%ef%bb%bfheart-brain-and-out-of-body/

2))http://kaitlynroland.wordpress.com/2013/05/01/hell-being-competitive-and-hot-yoga/#comment-504

Dr Oliver Sacks “The Inbetween Part Is Missing”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22301843

The quote relates to gaps in our knowledge about consciousness. It is taken from this short 3 minute film from the BBC which is a lovely introduction to the work of Dr Oliver Sacks, by himself, and his thoughts on the study of consciousness.

Heart, Brain and Out of Body

Now I know that people who read this blog are interested in some really diverse mind and body matters.

For whatever reason, one of the defining things about humanity is its infectious curiosity about the nature of existence and consciousness.

My recent readings around brain and heart have also included books by people on out of body experiences, epilepsy and spirituality.

Anything about these subjects is currently sparkly and eye-catching, so this week I was captivated by a BBC report on ‘The Lazarus Effect’. (1)

‘The Lazarus Effect’ (2) is a book about the heart and heart attacks, where new discoveries are changing the way that patients are being resuscitated.

When I was little, my mum had to go away to see my Granny after one of her many heart attacks.

Granny told mum that during the heart attack she was in a long tunnel, with what seemed to be a light at the end of it. Mum doesn’t know how long this experience lasted , but apparently Granny became aware that she may be very near leaving when she became conscious of people talking about how they had called my mum. My Granny thought that if my mum had been called then she would have to be there to see her. Somewhere in my Granny’s mind the seed of urgency to not slip away was planted. She came back to see my mum.

I was always really interested in this, and from reading around the subject I understand that a lot of people whose hearts stop report similar experiences.

‘Bringing people back from the Dead’, (1) BBC news report by William Kremer, links to a radio interview on the World service programme ‘Outlook’.  This programme was about Carol Brothers who had a heart attack and was resuscitated after 45 minutes of CPR.(3)

It interviews Dr Sam Parnia Director of resuscitation research in a New York hospital and author of ‘The Lazarus Effect’. Cooling the body from 37C to 32C causes Brain cells to remain intact for up to 8 hours before they begin to deteriorate. The tricky stages of resuscitation are when oxygen is reintroduced to the brain, the cells become inflamed and cause swelling in the brain. Cooling the brain down causes the brain to slow down to such an extent that people can look brain dead for a long time, but actually be in stasis. This means that resuscitating the heart has now been possible for up to 4 to 5 hours after the heart stopping.

In relation to out of body experiences, Dr Parnia has collected many examples of people’s OBE’s (out of body experiences ) which range from tunnels of light, relatives coming to meet them, reliving their lives, re-living events that inflicted pain on others. Dr Parnia says that often when the patient returns to consciousness they have determined to live their lives in a different, changed and often fearless way. He says he believes that most people experience these types of experiences but that they are unlikely to remember due to the brain trauma or inflammation wiping their memory.

Interestingly these experiences have different meanings in different cultures or religious contexts so are interpreted in the context of the beliefs of each individual.

‘Proof of Heaven’ by Dr Eben Alexander (4) is a neurosurgeon’s Journey into the afterlife.  Dr Alexander  contracted bacterial E. coli meningitis and was in a coma for 7 days. He was not expected to survive but against the odds he woke up to recount his journey (which was quite a trip!) in his book. Dr Alexander was a complete sceptic until he experienced this for himself.

‘The Body Electric’ by Robert O. Becker and Gary Selden (5) was published in 1985 and challenged the notions of mechanistic medicine, in particular in its views around regeneration. Within this book there is a chapter titled ‘The Lazarus Effect’. This chapter describes the discovery in 1973 that a Salamander can regenerate its heart if it is cut in half or wounded from 30% to 50%. Such a large wound sparks a massive healing response in the salamander. The findings were published in Nature in 1974.

The cover of ‘The Body Electric’ says the book ‘explores new pathways in our understanding of evolution, acupuncture, psychic phenomena and healing.’

Back to heart resuscitation.

So to summarise, the medical model is changing in relation to heart resuscitation, the cooler the better.

I leave you with the thoughtful CPR intervention skills of Vinnie jones and the question- have you ever had an out of body experience?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILxjxfB4zNk

1)http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22154552

2)http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Lazarus-Effect-Rewriting-Boundaries/dp/1846043077

3) http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p016tn56 Outlook Carol Brothers ‘I was dead for 45 minutes’

4) http://www.lifebeyonddeath.net/

5) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Body-Electric-Robert-Becker/dp/0688069711

Help Me Land The Best Job in the World!

I interrupt my normal range of blogging material to re-blog an application from Hilary ‘The Nomad Grad’ for support to get a job as a park ranger in OZ. She has quite a travel repatoir amongst her most memorable blog exploits has actually MET and spent a day with ‘The Muppets’. I wanted to show my support and encourage my fellow bloggers to join her media campaign. Good luck Nomad Grad. I hope you get your dream job!

her Muppet moments are here:

http://nomadgrad.com/2012/12/24/that-time-i-met-the-muppets/

The Nomad Grad

We interrupt your regularly scheduled broadcast to bring you a special Nomad Grad update (insert your own beepy noises and dramatic news anchor voice here.) And boy, is it a kangaroo of a ‘tale’…

Best Jobs in the World

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Singing for Alzheimer’s and Mysicophilia by Oliver Sacks

 

I recently had cause to dig out my copy of Oliver Sacks book Musicophilia and lend it to a friend, because she has started to volunteer for an organisation that is using singing to help people with Alzheimer’s. This improves memory, health and wellbeing.

For those of you that are interested the Alzheimer’s society project link is very interesting.

http://alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=760 and shows a video of the project and has links explaining what it is.

I know a lot of people who have said sound effects their epilepsy, I found this  newspaper review that explains what Musicophilia has to say about Alzheimers and epilepsy.

If anyone wants to borrow my copy just let me now and I can lend it to you when it gets back to me!

‘Sacks tells some very moving stories about those with terrifyingly profound amnesia, or Alzheimer’s disease, for whom music can “restore them to themselves”. People with aphasia can be taught to speak again through singing. On the other hand, previously healthy people begin to have “musical hallucinations”, blasted by intrusive ghostly music during every waking second; and others have seizures in response to music, or “musicogenic epilepsy” – which, intriguingly, can be selective. One woman Sacks cites “had seizures only in response to ‘modern, dissonant music,’ never in response to classical or romantic music” – and her husband was a composer of the type of music that gave her seizures, which one suspects may be a hint. But such a violent response to certain music might be more common than suspected: “Many people, [one researcher thought], might start to get a queer feeling – disturbing, perhaps frightening – when they heard certain music, but then would immediately retreat from the music, turn it off, or block their ears, so that they did not progress to a full-blown seizure.” Indeed, certain styles of free jazz have always made me physically nauseous.’

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2007/nov/03/scienceandnature.music review Stephen Poole The Guardian Newspaper

How your mind can heal your body – book review

I have been anicipating this post from Holistic yoga with Alyson for some time on the book by http://www.drdavidhamilton.com which I think is a great review of a book about ‘how your mind can heal your body’. Well worth checking out!

Holistic yoga with Alyson

bookcoverOver the winter new year break I received a pile of books from a friend who was having a clear out. One of them I read straight away: How your mind can heal your body by David Hamilton and I’ve meaning to blog about it for months because it’s very interesting, and has implications for our yoga practice, and our whole lives potentially.

At first glance my immediate reaction to the book and its title was ‘what nonsense’, but two things made me change my mind. One was that the title is a bit simplistic as the author does state several times that the mind can help heal the body and people should continue with their conventional medical treatment alongside adopting helpful mind-based approaches. The other reason was the extensive amount of research of human trials that he quotes that back up all his claims.

I think the book’s message…

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The Heart of Music

 

Thanks Aelana for this really interesting harp music therapy programme that looks at the relationship between the heart and music.

The site contains an interesting vimeo from the Institute of Heart Math about the heart and music.  Good information on using biofeedback to train heart rate variability, and induce relaxation and healing in the body.

When we lose consciousness or die, the hearing is one of the last senses to go.

Maybe this is why music is so sacred.

This also spreads light on why chanting is so healing.

When we chant or sing we are soothing our hearts! 🙂

Harping Heals

Harp playing relaxes, energizes, soothes, and heals the youngest of children and oldest of adults.

    • Releases emotional pain
    • Improves short-term memory and attention span
    • Increases social interaction
    • Builds self-esteem
    • Relieves stress

 

http://www.harptherapyinternational.com/

http://www.heartmath.org/