Time To Change

‘Everybody wants to get better but nobody wants to change.’
From
http://www.amazon.com/Nourishing-Destiny-Tradition-Chinese-Medicine/dp/0966991605

I was in class a week ago, and the teacher gave us all this quote at the end of the lesson.

I felt like I had come home.

There is a time to be active and a time to be still in everybody’s life;There is a time to feel and time to sleep.

Now is the time to change.

I have a lot of learning to do, and so for now I am am taking a break from posting to concentrate on being still and undertaking some major restructuring as well as study.
I may drop by from time to time with articles, but for now, my friends, I will be reading your stories, your thoughts, your feelings, and I will be wishing you well (and commenting from time to time).

I am going to change.

When I resurface, i hope to be different, and better and CHANGED. 🙂

For now I am happily per-suing my dreams.

Keep well, until next time

I hope you are per-suing your dreams as well.

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Investigating the root causes of the global health crisis: Paul Farmer on the TED Book “The Upstream Doctors”

just in case you haven’t see this already – it looks fascinating.

TED Blog

By Paul Farmer

At the end of almost a decade spent in teaching hospitals and clinics, most (we hope all) physicians have honed their clinical acumen by focusing on the care of the patient who is right in front of them. Perhaps this is as it should be: as patients, we don’t want our doctors (or nurses or social workers) distracted by “outside” considerations such as the suffering or concerns of other patients not there in the exam room or, heaven forfend, by abstractions such as the extra-personal social forces that place people in harm’s way. We want the doctor focused on us, by bringing expertise and attention to our specific “illness episode” and even to our minor aches and pains. That’s what we want: laser-like focus, to use another term from the medical profession, on our own “chief complaint.”

Or do we? What if most of our aches and…

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TCM Traditional Chinese Medicine

A brief introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine – otherwise known as epigenetics to the west. lovely blog two.

Endless Light and Love

TCM. Traditional Chinese Medicine in China.

china-tcm-man2

Traditional Chinese medical education has a history going back thousands of years, and it has kept abreast of the development of TCM culture and Chinese civilization, which is rarely seen in the world medical history. Numerous practitioners have been trained and they have offered much in medical and health care for the Chinese people, and promoted development of traditional Chinese medicine. So far, it occupies an important place in national medical education.

A Brief History of the TCM Education System in China.
The ancient medical examination system took shape during the Zhou Dynasty fro 1100-256 B.C. Laid down In the Zhou Li Yi Shi (The Chief Practitioners Book of Rites) the requirements for TCM chief practitioners were recorded. Their compensation depended upon the response to their treatment, e.g. those whose patients responded well to their treatment without any failiure received the highest level of…

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Wellness Warrior meets Wellness Warrior – Jess Ainscough interviews Lissa Rankin

http://www.thewellnesswarrior.com.au/2013/05/mind-over-medicine-my-interview-with-dr-lissa-rankin/

Two of my favourite wellness warriors get together to discuss Lissa Rankin’s new book ‘Mind over Medicine’.

Both of these ladies are very much on my page when it comes to health.

This interview is well worth listening to.

Important points raised during the interview are;
What does your body need to heal? What prescription does your body need you to prescribe for yourself? What would you do if you could do anything you wanted, to make yourself better?

– Leave your abusive relationship?
– Leave your horrible job?
– Go to college?
– Move countries?
– Get married?
– Do something you always wanted to do?
– Get a new job with a better employer? 🙂

Lissa’s idea about letting the patient write the prescription for themselves is really liberating.

In the context of epilepsy research I think it is relevant to the epilepsy research project what treatment would you prefer?:

http://www.epilepsy.org.uk/research/take-part/projects-you-can-take-part-in/patient-preferences-treatment-options

https://epilepsymeandneurology.wordpress.com/2013/05/20/national-epilepsy-week-19th-may-23rd-may-2013-what-treatment-do-you-prefer/

Nobody is the same, so everyone will need different treatment.

Healing is not neceserraly curing.

The moral of the story – Turn off your stress response, it could save your life.

I love epigenetics!

A video that will give you hope in the next generation

Trenton and Lindsay Cochran on caring and muscular dystrophy

TED Blog

Walt Cochran, a teacher in Kansas City, shared this touching video with us for Education Week about his children — one disabled, one not — who make you think about the depth of the sibling relationship. Lindsay, 10, suffers from a form of Muscular Dystrophy called Spinal Muscular Atrophy and has been in a wheelchair since she was 2 years old. Meanwhile her older brother Trent, 12, sees his role as not just protective older brother, but as an ambassador to remind others that kids with disabilities can do anything they put their mind to with the help of technology and support of loving relationships. Really, we dare you not to shed a tear while watching this.

This video feels especially relevant today given a comment we noticed on John Legend’s performance of “True Colors,” from Caroline Playle, who gave a talk at TEDxKingsCollege. She writes, “This just made me…

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What The Bleep Is Neurofeedback You Ask?

more insights into Neurofeedback, not just for robots!

WELL CALL ME CRAZY

 

I have been wanting…..okay attempting…..to write a post about the internship I was doing in neurotherapy. Specifically, a post that would explain what neurofeedback is and its use in treating brain disorders of any kind. The post would be easy to understand, comprehensive without being overwhelming, with a bit of humor thrown in for good measure. I was on draft number four of writing said post when a peer emailed me the article below and I thought, “Wow,this guy just took the words right out of my mouth…..and did it better than what I was imagining!” So, of course I have to share it with all of you. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did and that it spurs you on to learn more and share with others.

 

 

Neurofeedback: Alternative Health Care for Robots?

 

by John Anderson, M.A

 
Many people interested in…

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Epilepsy Research Is Getting Cool So Your Brain Isn’t Smoki’n!

http://www.epilepsy.com/newsletter/may13/brain_cooling?utm_source=Epilepsy+Therapy+Project&utm_campaign=bc6a33ff69-Epilepsy_News_5_1_13&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_cf0feb6500-bc6a33ff69-12439845

Following in the brain cooling tips of ‘The Lazarus Effect’(1) for cardiac arrest Dr Sirven of ETP (see link above) this week gives us the lowdown on brain cooling research for epilepsy treatment.

This excerpt says:

‘In the early view version of the journal, Epilepsia, Drs. Motamedi and colleagues from the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology at Georgetown University School of Medicine present a critical review and opinion article. It is known that brain cooling, otherwise known as therapeutic brain hypothermia, is already a standard of care for a condition such as cardiac arrest in adults, or in neonates in the situation of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. However, there has been an increasing number of research papers that have looked at the concept of utilizing hypothermia to help control seizures that might be used as part of an implantable device to cool the brain in a specific region. In this well written review, Drs. Motamedi and colleagues discuss research innovations in developing cooling as a viable option for the treatment of drug resistant epilepsy.’

So should we all be booking holidays in Iceland or heading for our refrigerator’s frozen broccoli and bags of peas to get out of the heat?

Well it is a bit soon to tell, but as this article from Kaitllyn Roland (2) emphasises the importance of being sensible about the type of exercise you do, and how to take care about body temperature in particular if you are prone to seizures.

I for one won’t be booking my trip to Spain in the middle of August or trying to navigate the Sahara desert, but everyone has their limits!

I hope this article finds you chilling out with some sunny weather keeping cool in the shade, spring may have finally arrived in the UK, or is it our summer?. 🙂

1) https://epilepsymeandneurology.wordpress.com/2013/04/26/%ef%bb%bfheart-brain-and-out-of-body/

2))http://kaitlynroland.wordpress.com/2013/05/01/hell-being-competitive-and-hot-yoga/#comment-504

Help Me Land The Best Job in the World!

I interrupt my normal range of blogging material to re-blog an application from Hilary ‘The Nomad Grad’ for support to get a job as a park ranger in OZ. She has quite a travel repatoir amongst her most memorable blog exploits has actually MET and spent a day with ‘The Muppets’. I wanted to show my support and encourage my fellow bloggers to join her media campaign. Good luck Nomad Grad. I hope you get your dream job!

her Muppet moments are here:

http://nomadgrad.com/2012/12/24/that-time-i-met-the-muppets/

The Nomad Grad

We interrupt your regularly scheduled broadcast to bring you a special Nomad Grad update (insert your own beepy noises and dramatic news anchor voice here.) And boy, is it a kangaroo of a ‘tale’…

Best Jobs in the World

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How your mind can heal your body – book review

I have been anicipating this post from Holistic yoga with Alyson for some time on the book by http://www.drdavidhamilton.com which I think is a great review of a book about ‘how your mind can heal your body’. Well worth checking out!

Holistic yoga with Alyson

bookcoverOver the winter new year break I received a pile of books from a friend who was having a clear out. One of them I read straight away: How your mind can heal your body by David Hamilton and I’ve meaning to blog about it for months because it’s very interesting, and has implications for our yoga practice, and our whole lives potentially.

At first glance my immediate reaction to the book and its title was ‘what nonsense’, but two things made me change my mind. One was that the title is a bit simplistic as the author does state several times that the mind can help heal the body and people should continue with their conventional medical treatment alongside adopting helpful mind-based approaches. The other reason was the extensive amount of research of human trials that he quotes that back up all his claims.

I think the book’s message…

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