Breatharianism – Doctors are baffled and monitoring medical miracle

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8652837.stm
Sanjoy Majumder reports from Delhi
Extreme Meditation and Fasting have come to the fore in this news item from India a man ‘survives without food or water for decades’.
The Doctors in this Sterling hospital are baffled by a holy man who claims to have survived on no food and water for 70 years.
The Holy man is now under military and medical surveillance in hospital.
He claims that meditation and the power of his mind keep him alive. Doctors are already impressed because he has been in hospital without food for 108 hours already.
This is NOT one I would recommend you try at home, but it makes you wonder doesn’t it?

Global Advances In Health And Medicine Journal – Towards Systems Based Health Care

http://www.gahmj.com/

Global Advances in Health and Medicine is – Improving Healthcare Outcomes Worldwide; is a progressive, systems based Journal that is based at the site above.

I got a link to it today and was very excited about articles within it such as ‘Chinese Scalp Acupuncture’by Drs Hao and Hao, review by Honora Lee Wolfe. She suggestes this book ‘would be very interesting reading for neurologists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, veterans hospital administrators, and any other specialists who work in any capacity with patients suffering from brain injuries, neurological diseases, chronic debilitating pain, or neuro-psychological disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).’

You may need to register to read the journal,but links on the homepage, such as ‘Evaluating the Economics of Complementary and Integrative Medicine’, are very constructive.

I subscribed to this liink via http://www.heartmath.org/ newsletter.

Mind Over Medicine – Lissa Rankin Book Launch

Lissa gave regular readers of her blog the opportunity read the first excerpt of ‘Mind Over Medicine’ by Lissa Rankin MD available to buy from a link on her blog.

I thought that everyone with an interest in healing (themselves or others) would be interested in her book, the subjects talked in the excerpt I read are; The placebo effect and its physiology, spontaneous remission from cancer, healing and belief. That was only a short extract!

Can’t wait to read the whole thing!

http://lissarankin.com/an-eggy-book-launch-happy-birth-day-mind-over-medicine?inf_contact_key=c0c764d605a6c01aaca9c07c0aa6fa3b21abd769dc36d07e70955d70cdb7a98e

Epilepsy Research Is Getting Cool So Your Brain Isn’t Smoki’n!

http://www.epilepsy.com/newsletter/may13/brain_cooling?utm_source=Epilepsy+Therapy+Project&utm_campaign=bc6a33ff69-Epilepsy_News_5_1_13&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_cf0feb6500-bc6a33ff69-12439845

Following in the brain cooling tips of ‘The Lazarus Effect’(1) for cardiac arrest Dr Sirven of ETP (see link above) this week gives us the lowdown on brain cooling research for epilepsy treatment.

This excerpt says:

‘In the early view version of the journal, Epilepsia, Drs. Motamedi and colleagues from the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology at Georgetown University School of Medicine present a critical review and opinion article. It is known that brain cooling, otherwise known as therapeutic brain hypothermia, is already a standard of care for a condition such as cardiac arrest in adults, or in neonates in the situation of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. However, there has been an increasing number of research papers that have looked at the concept of utilizing hypothermia to help control seizures that might be used as part of an implantable device to cool the brain in a specific region. In this well written review, Drs. Motamedi and colleagues discuss research innovations in developing cooling as a viable option for the treatment of drug resistant epilepsy.’

So should we all be booking holidays in Iceland or heading for our refrigerator’s frozen broccoli and bags of peas to get out of the heat?

Well it is a bit soon to tell, but as this article from Kaitllyn Roland (2) emphasises the importance of being sensible about the type of exercise you do, and how to take care about body temperature in particular if you are prone to seizures.

I for one won’t be booking my trip to Spain in the middle of August or trying to navigate the Sahara desert, but everyone has their limits!

I hope this article finds you chilling out with some sunny weather keeping cool in the shade, spring may have finally arrived in the UK, or is it our summer?. 🙂

1) https://epilepsymeandneurology.wordpress.com/2013/04/26/%ef%bb%bfheart-brain-and-out-of-body/

2))http://kaitlynroland.wordpress.com/2013/05/01/hell-being-competitive-and-hot-yoga/#comment-504

How your mind can heal your body – book review

I have been anicipating this post from Holistic yoga with Alyson for some time on the book by http://www.drdavidhamilton.com which I think is a great review of a book about ‘how your mind can heal your body’. Well worth checking out!

Holistic yoga with Alyson

bookcoverOver the winter new year break I received a pile of books from a friend who was having a clear out. One of them I read straight away: How your mind can heal your body by David Hamilton and I’ve meaning to blog about it for months because it’s very interesting, and has implications for our yoga practice, and our whole lives potentially.

At first glance my immediate reaction to the book and its title was ‘what nonsense’, but two things made me change my mind. One was that the title is a bit simplistic as the author does state several times that the mind can help heal the body and people should continue with their conventional medical treatment alongside adopting helpful mind-based approaches. The other reason was the extensive amount of research of human trials that he quotes that back up all his claims.

I think the book’s message…

View original post 754 more words

The Five Essentials … For Health & Happiness – Guest Blog

I would like to thank fredphillips.wordpress.com for this guest blog post, which shows, that we humans are not so different; and if you ask the universe (or the internet) you will find people out there who you have a lot in common with. 🙂 thanks fred!

There are five things that are essential for our health and happiness. I call these, oddly enough, The Five Essentials. Catchy, eh?

We are in the midst of enormous suffering on the planet. Rates of disease are spiraling upwards. Bullying is an epidemic, especially in our schools.  Regional and domestic conflicts abound. Many magnificent species are disappearing, or at the risk of disappearing, from the planet.

I could go on and regale you with more depressing stuff, but I really don’t want you to stop reading.

The truth is (and I believe this with all my heart), there is a solution to all this misery and it has to do with … you guessed it  … The Five Essentials. So let’s get right to it. Here they are:

  1. To have an awareness of the truths of our existence
  2. To feel good about ourselves
  3. To heal our emotional pain
  4. To eat and drink healthy stuff
  5. To get active

Let’s briefly examine each of these essentials to see what they’re all about. (Yes, I know, a couple of them are rather self evident.)

1. To have an awareness of the truths of our existence:

Understanding the truths of who we really are and why we’re really here on the planet (there is little evidence to suggest it has anything to do with getting rich & famous) is critical if we have any hope of changing human behaviour. It certainly inspired me to change mine. I think if we knew for instance, that we live in oneness with God and everything else that exists, we would not treat each other the way we do. We wouldn’t start wars. We wouldn’t exploit the animal kingdom and we wouldn’t pollute. We would let go of fear. We would live with more compassion and love. We would be more altruistic. And we would be more humble.

If you want to know more, immerse yourself in spirituality. Talk to spiritual people. Read books by Eckhart Tolle, Caroline Myss, Wayne Dyer, Neale Donald Walsch and my own book, The History Teacher. Read my spiritual posts at fredphillips.wordpress.com.

2. To feel good about ourselves:

If we all felt good about ourselves … if we all felt lovable, worthy, good enough and empowered … again, we would not behave the way we do. We would not mistreat others. We would be more kind and forgiving. We would be more honest. We wouldn’t put people out of work. We would eat healthier foods.

If you want to change the way you feel about yourself, just be kind.

3. To heal our emotional pain:

We are a society full of unresolved emotional pain. We are loaded with anger, grief, shame, guilt and resentment. If we have any hope of creating peace on earth (one of the reasons we’re here), we need to release this pain. We need to transform it into something healthier and more positive.

If you want to heal your unresolved emotional pain, forgive who you need to forgive, apologize who you need to apologize to, cry if you need to and when you feel anger, scream into a pillow until you feel better.

4. To eat and drink healthy:

With all due respect to those who earn their living working in the fast food, junk food and processed food industries, if we really want to put an end to cancer and all other forms of disease, we need to eat better. We especially need to drastically reduce our sugar intake and eliminate artificial sweeteners and gmos. Why? Because this stuff acidifies our bodies and weakens our immune systems (80% of our immune system is situated in our gastrointestinal tract), leaving us susceptible to disease.

If you want to do one simple thing to improve your diet and your health, start eating fermented foods, especially, sauerkraut. It will put much needed healthy bacteria in your gut.

5. To get active:

As a whole,  we are far too sedentary and we’re paying a high price for it. Our bodies aren’t fit, leaving us vulnerable to stress and disease. We need to get active. I highly recommend martial arts or yoga, but if you do nothing else, go for a walk every day!

I believe in my heart that having an awareness of these Five Essentials, understanding  them and incorporating them into our daily lives will bring us peace of mind, joyful living and love (sign me up for that). They will bring us happiness (that too)!

Neurological Rock Stars 4 – Dai Greene Captain GB Athletics Team

http://www.epilepsysociety.org.uk/WhatWeDo/News/DaiGreenecaptainsGBteam

I came across this piece in epilepsy society about Dai Greene, a fellow welsh person and his inspiring athletics career. His career in athletics  has assisted him to manage his seizures without medication.

There is a link to an interview with Dai Greene in Epilepsy Review issue 2 2011.

He talks about combating common problems with epilepsy by health, lifestyle and sleep management.

He talks about the differences between his seizure management and his brother who also has epilepsy.

Really impressive and inspiring story!

Advice call after epilepsy drug Epilim study – Epilepsy Care In Wales BBC News

In the wake of the withdrawal of legal aid in the ‘Families who were pursuing a legal case against the makers of an epilepsy drug have dropped their action because legal aid was withdrawn’ BBC News January 20th 2011

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-21523434 London reporting on Pregnant women ‘unaware’ of epilepsy drug risks 25th February 2013, BBC Wales are now reporting:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-12242857

“Campaigner Nicole Crosby-McKenna, from Epilepsy Action, wants the Welsh government to review the way information is conveyed to pregnant patients in Wales.

She said: “We would like to know, if they haven’t got access to an epilepsy specialist nurse, who is giving the women that information? Are the GPs passing the information on to women? And also, do the GPs have enough specialist knowledge to accurately give them pre-conception counselling?”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-21733153

See BBC news links for full details.

Epilepsy, the National Health Service and the post code lottery – A Tale of Two, or Three or Many Postcodes

I have had some time to think about writing this post. It was sparked by my fellow bloggers post about the loss of her epilepsy nurse (1).

I do not have an epilepsy nurse. I had to put up quite a fight to keep my consultant neurologist.

First I would like to say thank you to my Consultant Neurologist and to my GP Doctors medical practice. I would like to say thank-you, you are all great and you are all doing the best you can in what appears to be increasingly difficult conditions in relation to funding health services in the UK.

But in relation to access to health care for epilepsy, this is my story.

As a child with epilepsy I saw my consultant pediatrician and was assigned to him until my 18th year when I finally became an adult under UK health provision.

He tended to my health care needs and oversaw my prescription medication. He was a lovely man and I was sad to hear he has now passed away.

I encountered the biggest problems with seizures whilst I was at college in my late teens and early 20’s. I had moved away from my home hospital in Wales and after a couple of years ended up in England.

There did not seem to be any plan for who would oversee my medication and epilepsy care. I think on reflection that this was at a time when there were no National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for epilepsy care (2)(3) in the UK. Through organisations like Epilepsy Action (4) awareness of the importance of epilepsy care has also grown amongst health care professionals.

My GP (General Practitioner) in England was in charge of my medication and decided to change it. The change was made (as it always is) in my best interests. When I had a significant deterioration in seizure control because of the new medication it took 2 years for me to be assigned to a Consultant Neurologist in a different county in England.

England has different health care arrangements by different County’s much like Wales, but these shift depending on where the specialist services are located.

The consultant who I was assigned to was an expert in his field, but he had a LOT of patients and not a lot of time for me. This experience was not a positive one.

I moved from one county in England to another county, and despite significant problems with seizures there really wasn’t much help from my then neurologist because he just gave me more and more medication which didn’t work.

It is difficult not to want to apportion blame, but I have come to the conclusion that when things go wrong rather than being one person’s fault it is in fact a huge system failure that by and large results in poor health care.

I think that medication is seen as the cheapest option and therefore, for a lot of people the only one.

Finally after some years, my GP decided to take action and referred me to a new Neurologist. This is the one I see to this day. I hold him in high esteem and think he is very thorough. He does listen to me, even though we have differences in opinion.

The problem with this was we had to start from scratch.

He left no stone unturned in the search for my brain squiggles (EEG), and although it took years for him to confirm that I am indeed epileptic, at least I now have closure on this. It made me highly anxious that there may have been some possibility that I could have a brain tumour, scar or be so deeply troubled that I might be able to lose consciousness and go blue and have convulsions all by myself. Then there were the lights, headaches, myoclonic jerks and medication side effects as well as partial seizures.

I could access the epilepsy nurse under my Neurological Consultant in England.

I will never be able to thank my neurologist enough for removing most of my medication.

I can now think.

But it wasn’t over there.

I am now back in Wales and continued to see my neurologist in England without any problems for several years. I did not have an epilepsy nurse, but that didn’t matter so much because I was assigned to a specialist neurologist.

Then the local health board was re-arranged to create a different funding structure a few years ago.

The county where I live does not have a Specialist Consultant Neurologist for Epilepsy or Epilepsy Nurse.

One day I got a letter from the hospital in England saying that my health board were no longer going to pay for my neurological consultations.

This decision had been taken by the local health board without assigning me to a Consultant Epilepsy Neurologist in Wales, or Consulting my General Practitioner or my consultant neurologist in England.

I was absolutely furious. I made a complaint with the help of an NHS Advocate.

I was not able to see my consultant for a year.

It took the health board that long to work out that they would have to pay for me to see a Consultant Neurologist in Wales if they did not continue to fund my trips to England.

As part of my complaint I asked the health board to tell me what they planned to do about access to epilepsy services in Wales.

Then there was a change in Government.

I am now deeply troubled by the current government’s ideas about private health care. (5)(6)

My health has suffered because there was not a joined up service. Under the new proposals, the NHS would be more open to private companies and further fragmentation.

I have seen how private companies and fragmentation has negatively affected the welfare state in Britain.

I find it deeply troubling that more and more people not just with epilepsy but with other health problems will fall through the gaps or face charges for care when there is no money.

If your health is poor you can’t work.

I feel like I have to do all the health care work for myself.

I still don’t have an epilepsy nurse.

In comparison to some countries I obviously feel grateful to have health care at all.

This is not everyone’s experience of epilepsy care in Britain, but it is mine.

1) http://rosewinelover.com/2013/02/25/you-wont-be-seeing-frank-any-more-hes-no-longer-here/

2)http://publications.nice.org.uk/the-epilepsies-the-diagnosis-and-management-of-the-epilepsies-in-adults-and-children-in-primary-and-cg137

3)http://publications.nice.org.uk/the-epilepsies-the-diagnosis-and-management-of-the-epilepsies-in-adults-and-children-in-primary-and-cg137/key-priorities-for-implementation#management

4) Epilepsy Action http://www.epilepsy.org.uk/

5) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-21649307

6) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-21703667

Coconut oil for dementia and alzheimers disease – Natural News.com

http://www.naturalnews.com/039388_coconut_oil_dementia_Alzheimers_disease.html

Really interesting information about coconut oil and inflammation caused by oxidative stress in the brain.

Thanks to which ever blogger it was that put up a link to Nautral News – I can’t find the origional link but thanks and please identify yourself to me so I can credit you!