Global Advances In Health And Medicine Journal – Towards Systems Based Health Care

http://www.gahmj.com/

Global Advances in Health and Medicine is – Improving Healthcare Outcomes Worldwide; is a progressive, systems based Journal that is based at the site above.

I got a link to it today and was very excited about articles within it such as ‘Chinese Scalp Acupuncture’by Drs Hao and Hao, review by Honora Lee Wolfe. She suggestes this book ‘would be very interesting reading for neurologists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, veterans hospital administrators, and any other specialists who work in any capacity with patients suffering from brain injuries, neurological diseases, chronic debilitating pain, or neuro-psychological disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).’

You may need to register to read the journal,but links on the homepage, such as ‘Evaluating the Economics of Complementary and Integrative Medicine’, are very constructive.

I subscribed to this liink via http://www.heartmath.org/ newsletter.

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DSM-5 – Doesn’t Seem to Make sense?

Now here’s something you don’t see every day!

For anyone that has ever thought that DSM was just a manual for prescription pharmaceuticals;

The British Psychological Society’s Division of Clinical Psychology have been busy formulating a less than politically correct opinion about DSM-5!

‘Dr Lucy Johnstone, a consultant clinical psychologist who helped draw up the DCP’s statement, said it was unhelpful to see mental health issues as illnesses with biological causes.

“On the contrary, there is now overwhelming evidence that people break down as a result of a complex mix of social and psychological circumstances – bereavement and loss, poverty and discrimination, trauma and abuse,” Johnstone said. The provocative statement by the DCP has been timed to come out shortly before the release of DSM-5, the fifth edition of the American Psychiatry Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.’

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/may/12/psychiatrists-under-fire-mental-health

Who knows?

NEXT they may suggest that ‘a complex mix of social and psychological circumstances – bereavement and loss, poverty and discrimination, trauma and abuse’ can’t be fixed by pills! But that would be REALLY far out.

DSM – 5, Does it Make Sense to you?

addendum

also see posts:

http://wellcallmecrazy.wordpress.com/2013/05/05/breaking-news-this-just-in/ VERY PROMISING

http://ahmritanaturalmentalhealth.wordpress.com/2013/01/04/natural-therapies-holistic-vs-conformist/ very good points about holistic treatment

I would also add that the human body made up of its billions of cells, and billions of neurons is not something that can be put into the latest version of ‘windows’. Trying to put the body and mind into boxes or categories is only useful if you look at the relationships between the categories (ie anatomy and physiology, psychology and physiology etc in a similar way to Chinese Medicine).

Until we look at the whole picture healthcare will continue to perform like a broken record, which is tragic because so many lives would not be needlessly wasted, all because of our failure as human beings to look outside of the box of an outdated, mechanistic model of the mind, body and spirit.

Looks like lots of people are beginning to step out of the box and ask questions about our health care and beliefs.

Advice call after epilepsy drug Epilim study – Epilepsy Care In Wales BBC News

In the wake of the withdrawal of legal aid in the ‘Families who were pursuing a legal case against the makers of an epilepsy drug have dropped their action because legal aid was withdrawn’ BBC News January 20th 2011

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-21523434 London reporting on Pregnant women ‘unaware’ of epilepsy drug risks 25th February 2013, BBC Wales are now reporting:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-12242857

“Campaigner Nicole Crosby-McKenna, from Epilepsy Action, wants the Welsh government to review the way information is conveyed to pregnant patients in Wales.

She said: “We would like to know, if they haven’t got access to an epilepsy specialist nurse, who is giving the women that information? Are the GPs passing the information on to women? And also, do the GPs have enough specialist knowledge to accurately give them pre-conception counselling?”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-21733153

See BBC news links for full details.

Epilepsy, the National Health Service and the post code lottery – A Tale of Two, or Three or Many Postcodes

I have had some time to think about writing this post. It was sparked by my fellow bloggers post about the loss of her epilepsy nurse (1).

I do not have an epilepsy nurse. I had to put up quite a fight to keep my consultant neurologist.

First I would like to say thank you to my Consultant Neurologist and to my GP Doctors medical practice. I would like to say thank-you, you are all great and you are all doing the best you can in what appears to be increasingly difficult conditions in relation to funding health services in the UK.

But in relation to access to health care for epilepsy, this is my story.

As a child with epilepsy I saw my consultant pediatrician and was assigned to him until my 18th year when I finally became an adult under UK health provision.

He tended to my health care needs and oversaw my prescription medication. He was a lovely man and I was sad to hear he has now passed away.

I encountered the biggest problems with seizures whilst I was at college in my late teens and early 20’s. I had moved away from my home hospital in Wales and after a couple of years ended up in England.

There did not seem to be any plan for who would oversee my medication and epilepsy care. I think on reflection that this was at a time when there were no National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for epilepsy care (2)(3) in the UK. Through organisations like Epilepsy Action (4) awareness of the importance of epilepsy care has also grown amongst health care professionals.

My GP (General Practitioner) in England was in charge of my medication and decided to change it. The change was made (as it always is) in my best interests. When I had a significant deterioration in seizure control because of the new medication it took 2 years for me to be assigned to a Consultant Neurologist in a different county in England.

England has different health care arrangements by different County’s much like Wales, but these shift depending on where the specialist services are located.

The consultant who I was assigned to was an expert in his field, but he had a LOT of patients and not a lot of time for me. This experience was not a positive one.

I moved from one county in England to another county, and despite significant problems with seizures there really wasn’t much help from my then neurologist because he just gave me more and more medication which didn’t work.

It is difficult not to want to apportion blame, but I have come to the conclusion that when things go wrong rather than being one person’s fault it is in fact a huge system failure that by and large results in poor health care.

I think that medication is seen as the cheapest option and therefore, for a lot of people the only one.

Finally after some years, my GP decided to take action and referred me to a new Neurologist. This is the one I see to this day. I hold him in high esteem and think he is very thorough. He does listen to me, even though we have differences in opinion.

The problem with this was we had to start from scratch.

He left no stone unturned in the search for my brain squiggles (EEG), and although it took years for him to confirm that I am indeed epileptic, at least I now have closure on this. It made me highly anxious that there may have been some possibility that I could have a brain tumour, scar or be so deeply troubled that I might be able to lose consciousness and go blue and have convulsions all by myself. Then there were the lights, headaches, myoclonic jerks and medication side effects as well as partial seizures.

I could access the epilepsy nurse under my Neurological Consultant in England.

I will never be able to thank my neurologist enough for removing most of my medication.

I can now think.

But it wasn’t over there.

I am now back in Wales and continued to see my neurologist in England without any problems for several years. I did not have an epilepsy nurse, but that didn’t matter so much because I was assigned to a specialist neurologist.

Then the local health board was re-arranged to create a different funding structure a few years ago.

The county where I live does not have a Specialist Consultant Neurologist for Epilepsy or Epilepsy Nurse.

One day I got a letter from the hospital in England saying that my health board were no longer going to pay for my neurological consultations.

This decision had been taken by the local health board without assigning me to a Consultant Epilepsy Neurologist in Wales, or Consulting my General Practitioner or my consultant neurologist in England.

I was absolutely furious. I made a complaint with the help of an NHS Advocate.

I was not able to see my consultant for a year.

It took the health board that long to work out that they would have to pay for me to see a Consultant Neurologist in Wales if they did not continue to fund my trips to England.

As part of my complaint I asked the health board to tell me what they planned to do about access to epilepsy services in Wales.

Then there was a change in Government.

I am now deeply troubled by the current government’s ideas about private health care. (5)(6)

My health has suffered because there was not a joined up service. Under the new proposals, the NHS would be more open to private companies and further fragmentation.

I have seen how private companies and fragmentation has negatively affected the welfare state in Britain.

I find it deeply troubling that more and more people not just with epilepsy but with other health problems will fall through the gaps or face charges for care when there is no money.

If your health is poor you can’t work.

I feel like I have to do all the health care work for myself.

I still don’t have an epilepsy nurse.

In comparison to some countries I obviously feel grateful to have health care at all.

This is not everyone’s experience of epilepsy care in Britain, but it is mine.

1) http://rosewinelover.com/2013/02/25/you-wont-be-seeing-frank-any-more-hes-no-longer-here/

2)http://publications.nice.org.uk/the-epilepsies-the-diagnosis-and-management-of-the-epilepsies-in-adults-and-children-in-primary-and-cg137

3)http://publications.nice.org.uk/the-epilepsies-the-diagnosis-and-management-of-the-epilepsies-in-adults-and-children-in-primary-and-cg137/key-priorities-for-implementation#management

4) Epilepsy Action http://www.epilepsy.org.uk/

5) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-21649307

6) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-21703667

Britons beware of changes to the NHS. A Time Magazine article on the problems with private health care accross the pond.

Health & Family

Corrections Appended: February 26, 2013

1. Routine Care, Unforgettable Bills
When Sean Recchi, a 42-year-old from Lancaster, Ohio, was told last March that he had non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, his wife Stephanie knew she had to get him to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Stephanie’s father had been treated there 10 years earlier, and she and her family credited the doctors and nurses at MD Anderson with extending his life by at least eight years.

Because Stephanie and her husband had recently started their own small technology business, they were unable to buy comprehensive health insurance. For $469 a month, or about 20% of their income, they had been able to get only a policy that covered just $2,000 per day of any hospital costs. “We don’t take that kind of discount insurance,” said the woman at MD Anderson when Stephanie called to make an appointment for Sean.

Stephanie was then…

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