Health Problems and Emotional Wellbeing – Prevention Not Cure

In his forward to Chinese Medical Qigong page 1 (1) Marc S. Micozzi M.D. PHD states “current political debates in the US about healthcare “reform” amount only to “rearranging the deck chairs on the SS Titanic”.

Personally I would extend this description of healthcare to Britain as well, because in my experience current welfare and NHS “reform” amounts to the same superficial, short sighted rearrangement. (2)

In global economic recession poverty and therefore health problems are on the rise.

In the book ‘Violence, inequality and human freedom’ by Peter Iadicola and Anson Shupe; ‘structural violence’ is described as ‘violence of institutions’, ‘for example, violence can be an outcome of how we have organised society in terms of access to basic necessities of survival’ (3). The implications of which are limited access to medical care and education for the poor.

In the wake of the economic sinking ship there is the question; how to tackle health problems when poverty is on the rise?

The NICE Guidelines for clinical excellence (4) lay out the ‘stepped approach’ for mental health problems and recommend therapies such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, counselling and access to health care services which should be available to combat common mental health disorders. NICE lays out all guidelines for healthcare in Britain.

It is unfortunate that the resources to provide for these guidelines are being cut, or in some cases are simply not there at all (5). Additionally changes to the benefit system are being made which negatively impact upon the emotional health of the sick and disabled (6).

The situation is not helped by competition for the little work that is available. It is easier to manage health with an income and something to occupy the mind such as a job, in my experience.

What possible solutions are there to these problems?

Could the application of systems theory (7) be the beginning of change in bringing information about health to the masses?

In her book ‘Your Health is Your Wealth’, Jacqueline Harvey appears to be supporting the view that self-education and self-care and responsibility are the way forward in terms of a long term solutions to integrative health. (8)

I support this whole heartedly, as in my experience holistic health practices such as yoga (9) and tai chi (10) are very beneficial for health and promote self-care and self-education. They encourage the exploration of body, nutrition/diet and psychological personal development.

It would be nice to think that children have the opportunity to access these types of exercises and mindfulness practices, as well as physical education and sports so that in the future they did not need to access Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (11) for health conditions like personality disorder. DBT has some basis in Buddhist mindfulness practice. Would it therefore be cost effective to build mindfully based approaches to health into the education and health system from an early age?

In the circumstances the building of networks, social or otherwise, and communities on a local, national and worldwide scale; made up of existing established resources, practices and health resources seem like the way forward in tipping the balance towards preventing health problems and managing conditions.

I think I am a little bit ‘evangelical’ about promoting personal health care exploration.

God bless the World Wide Web.

And finally:http://www.drfranklipman.com/motivation-and-personality/ an after thought but very relevent.

References

(1) Chinese Medical Qigong – Editor in Chief: Tianjun Liu, OMD Associate Editor in Chief: Kevin W Chen, Ph.D.

(2) http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/vincent-brogan/private-healthcare-and-th_b_1909057.html?utm_hp_ref=health-and-social-care-bill

(3) Violence, Inequality and Human Freedom by Peter Iadicola and Anson Shupe ISBN:0-7425-1923-6 Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc

(4) http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/live/13476/54520/54520.pdf

(5) http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/jul/11/benefit-reforms-penalise-disabled-people

(6) http://www.macmillan.org.uk/Documents/GetInvolved/Campaigns/Benefits/FailedByTheSystemReport.pdf

(7) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Systems_theory

(8) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Your-Health-Is-Wealth/dp/1401916287

mine came free with http://www.ommagazine.com/ October 2012

(9) http://littlewindmillyoga.com/2012/10/21/yoga-the-ultimate-freedom-trailer/

(10)                    http://www.taichimaster.com/tai-chi/the-tai-chi-tipping-point/

(11)                    http://www.priory.com/dbt.htm

A Breath of Fresh Air – Post viral O2

There is nothing like influenza to boost catch up reading.

Ironically the book I chose to read was called ‘The Revelation of the Breath’ by Sharon G. Mijares Editor.

This collection of short essays on breathing did at least serve the purpose of ramming home to me why I was sick in the first place (unhealthy breathing patterns). It is a fabulous introduction to many breathing techniques from east to west, religious, spiritual and medical.

What I particularly liked about it was an article on breathing for Aikido by Darrell Bluhm Shihan.

I really like aikido but have never read up on it in particular because my teacher who is a bit of a traditionalist, put the emphasis on ‘doing’ not ‘reading’.

When I asked if there were any books he recommended he told me in no uncertain terms that it was practice not reading I should be concentrating on.

Fair point really.

But this book is really good  at explaining breathing techniques, their purposes and the philosophy, physiology and psychology behind them.

I was particularly taken by Buteyko for asthma, sleep and apnoea, and Rebirthing completely reframed birth trauma. The section on Freediving was quite revealing. Personally holding my breath is not an area I have ever explored (one of the diving instructors I met said that underwater diving and epilepsy aren’t a good gas and air mix).

Maybe I’ll just have to practice pausing between air intake and exhale for now. There are lots of rhythms to use after all.

Breath can be energising or relaxing, exciting or tranquil. Huffing and puffing can be quite good fun 🙂

I like that someone took the time to write about how breathing can be a revelation.

Make of it what you will I hope you enjoy this book as much as I am.

Here is a link to view it, also available from Amazon.

http://www.sunypress.edu/p-4912-the-revelation-of-the-breath.aspx

At One With Flu – when it’s not a good idea to put up a fight

I have now been in bed for over a week.

I am a little bit put out.

Viruses trigger more seizures and I spent my first 3 days twitching.

It has taken me nearly a week to come to terms with the fact that something smaller than I can see, probably only made up of protein/ amino acids has hijacked my immune system and busily replicating its way through my cells.

I feel violated.

Unfortunately it seems that trying to ‘do’ something about it is the last thing that I should be doing.

This time it looks like I will have to stay in bed for another few days until my body has finally ‘slept’ it off.

Trying to feel inner peace for my flu virus is actually quite a strain, my liver is clearly having a field day.

I’m off to try to mediate on compassion (and do lying chi gung).

Epilepsy and fear – Why Shiatsu?

“Transformation happens when we live through the experience of deep fear. Seeing fear as a signal to hide in some realm of safety prevents our connection to what lies behind our self-identity. When we ignore parts of ourselves, or the world, in response to fear, we insist on too small an identity. If we are lucky those ignored parts will come knocking at our door revealing what appears menacing to be actually some part of ourself which we cannot yet accept as our own. “

Bridgette Ludwig Shiatsu Society Journal Autumn 2012

Health problems bring us closer to fear. They remind us we are not immortal.

One problem of living with epilepsy is that there is the fear. The fear of when the next seizure will come. The fear of not waking up.  Spending waking moments wondering about black out or experienceing altered states of consciousness? Fear of loosing control or having no control over the way life opens out. It is hard to plan ahead when there is no guarantee that seizures won’t get in the way.

Coping mechanisms for this type of problem can allow us to carry on and live life to the maximum. Feeling grounded and centred in the body is helpful to remind us that we are ’in our bodies’ rather than ‘out of our bodies’ in the sense of unconscious and disconnected by the experience of living through a seizure.

The power of touch in particular, in this example shiatsu, can bring us back into our bodies and help us to realign with life following disconnection brought about by seizures.

It is important that coping mechanisms don’t become our prison. Change is the essence of moving through and forward through fear.

Without fear there would be no control. We instinctively look to control our lives but is there any control when none of us can be certain what will happen next?

Fear cripples if it is not challenged.

Only when we challenge the fear does it loose its power and therefore the control it has over us.

“The whole secret of existence is to have no fear. Never fear what will become of you, depend on no one. Only the moment you reject all help are you freed.”
Buddha

Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/fear.html#6JqP39s9pl2Qk8SL.99

Shiatsu is a holistic therapy which utilizes healing touch and treats the whole person mind, body and spirit.

Read more about it at:

http://www.shiatsusociety.org/content/about-shiatsu