Pushing The Boundaries – Epilepsy and Karate part 1

Wearing a Gi (karate suit) is a bit like going on camera because you gain a few pounds.
What on earth was I doing?
My first brush with a Dojo (Japanese martial training hall) was when I was 12. It was my good friend (or fiend depending on how you look at her) who thought it would be a good idea to go and train with or local karate club under Sensi Roger Sayce.
Roger was well loved by everybody who he taught and to this day I will never forget how every time he saw me he would ask when I was going to start training again.
So it didn’t last long.
Roger never gave up on me, if only he were alive today I would be able to tell him how much I now appreciate this and thank him.
There were a couple of reasons training came to an end. One was the distance and effort required to get to town for after school training (a mile to a milk stand outside a farm, 12 miles to town with my neighbour who was going training and her very kind dad who offered me lifts), Seizures and medication and also the grading examiner who was a bit scary. As a 12 year old I think I started shaking when he started shouting and shook all through the examinations – just two of them in two years. I was not brimming with confidence as a child and so I was quite happy to go and train without re-visiting grading’s (where you get a shiny new belt).
Mum and Dad were not enthused by my new found hobby and steadfastly refused to support me in my pursuit of ‘violence’. Unfortunately they missed the bit about fitness, discipline, confidence, self -defence, spirit, etc.
Eventually after a couple of years I stopped training at the level of temporary red belt or 8th Kyu.
Years passed and I declared I would start karate again ‘over my dead body’.
Time passed and my good friend married someone who also eat, slept and breathed karate. She and everyone else I started training with reached dizzying heights of ninja skills and I just got more and more sick.
And so, years later, I started karate training once more for a large number of reasons.
After being described by my friend’s husband as a ‘tai chi tree hugging hippie’ I thought I should check out the local club once more (pride in NO way played a part).
In all seriousness there are good reasons to train with people who seem to have turned out confident, self -assured, independent, assertive individuals. When faced with life’s problems they all seem to stand firmly in the face of adversity.

What did I have to loose?

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