‘It’s character building’ – Epilepsy and Karate part 2

I read an article written by one Sensei analysing how she felt following a car accident where she injured her back quite badly and found her-self lying in hospital thinking ‘none of this is as bad as a training session with our Sensei’.

Under the firm conviction that ‘it’s a man’s world a girl’s got to be able to look after herself’ I put aside my reservations about Karate and joint care to have a go as an adult.

As a child I struggled to hit people with conviction. Not being the slightest bit athletic I was happier doing kata as it meant remembering patterns or dancing around as I saw it (all wannabe ballerina’s do!). I only learnt 3 kata because I didn’t stay long enough to learn any more.

As an adult, thankfully, like ‘Cat- woman’ in the latest Batman film ‘The Dark Night Rises’; I don’t feel quite so strongly about not hitting people. Preferring the approach of ‘varying degrees of massage’ I did feel strongly that it is important to be able to defend myself.

I went to see the film ‘Lawless’ last night (based on a true story) (1). The story of 3 brothers, the youngest of whom is Jack Bondurant (played by Shia Lebouf) who wouldn’t hurt a fly.

The film is interesting from the point of view that we see the events that change Jack.

How violence and injustice cause people to behave and the outcome at the end make for a gripping movie. What is more interesting is that the final straw is not violence inflicted on Jack, but against those he loves that is the emotional turning point.

The film is a study of fear and survival at a time of great hardship.

Physical and psychological attack is something that happens in life. No-one wants a big sign over their head saying ‘kick me’.

Sickness and disability in particular make people vulnerable to harassment, discrimination and abuse.

The way sick and disabled people are viewed in Britain currently is a whole new Dickensian novel. (2)

The Paralympics have just been hosted In Britain and while this has brought much discussion and debate in our country about ability in the context of disability; society has a long way to go before everyone is treated as equal. (3)

My own personal ‘fight back’ campaign began with Karate as a child and somehow stayed in my head as a ‘Nemesis’.

If I could draw a line pinpointing where it all started to go pear-shaped at 12 years old after falling down the stairs from having a seizure then Karate was the defining event.

Ultimately to beat epilepsy it felt like I had to do karate.

If I were a computer it would be like going in and re-writing the programming. Who doesnt need a copy of ‘Toumb Raider’ amongst the microsoft office software?

Is this going towards the ‘Dark side’ or facing up to my own demons?

Personally to me it felt like I was addressing something within myself.

I wake up every day and look at myself in the mirror. I see my best friend and my worst enemy. That is before I even have to deal with anybody else.

When I first started training I was very ill. I purchased a t-shirt with a superman ‘S’ on the front. It was like I needed to create my own personal alter ego to make me superhuman and to protect me.

Nearly 5 years down the line I can honestly say that karate training has helped me keep a job (despite discrimination), keep my home and given me the help I need without having to resort to violence.

I think that everybody can find their inner ‘grit’. For me I just needed to find the people who could show me the way.

There is no such thing as superheros who can protect us.

If we are lucky we have friends who care enought to look out for us.

It would be nice to think that there is someone out there that would fight for you when your screaming but no-one can hear you.

1)      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawless_(film)

2)      http://www.ukuncut.org.uk/blog/press-release-former-paralympian-joins-activists-to-target-atos#.UDaRnwwg0j0.facebook

1)      http://apps.facebook.com/theguardian/commentisfree/2012/aug/23/paralympians-state-help-disabled-benefits-cut

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My Favourite ‘Pep’ Blogs – ‘Gin and T’ for your in box

When your health’s gets you down in the dumps there are things you can do for yourself to make your day go better.

I do this by seeking out the people who are having a good day. Friends and family sometimes aren’t enough.

Getting connected via the internet is a useful tool to make connections via social media, networking and blogging sites. If you can’t talk or leave the house this can be the only way to get ‘empowered’.

There are lots of people out there who have insight into wellness, holistic and mind -body medicines. Remember you are not alone in being unwell and that the nature of the human condition means that this won’t change.

If you have been somehow hoodwinked into thinking that poor health is something that happens to other people or that you are unlucky enough to be alone in your suffering then it’s time to look around!

EVERY BODY NEEDS BACKUP!

Remember – no man is an island! 🙂

Seriously;

The current medical model does not include a pep talk at your doctor’s from a wellness warrior. This is a great shame because getting us into shape when we are not at our best can need military strategy.

Don’t just rely on your doctor.

For this reason some of my favourite blogs are from ladies and gentlemen who in their own way are driven to educate us on our health and well –being. Either by sharing their experience or by providing information about how to improve your physical, emotional, mental or spiritual health.

I have some regulars that I stream directly into my life and some of these I would like to share with you.

In no particular order I give you;

Number 1

http://www.thewellnesswarrior.com.au/

Jessica Ainscough

This lady is clearly THE ULTIMATE aptly named ‘wellness warrior’. She survived cancer and so to be honest every word she writes I cling to like a limpet; because you don’t know how good you have it until you read about someone else’s misfortune. This lady is very positive and provides me with a little ray of sunshine even when I feel like a glow slug.

Number 2

http://sierrabender.com

Sierra Bender

Following some truly awful experiences around ectopic pregnancy Sierra went on to write ‘Goddess to the core’ and brings to America ‘Boot-camp for goddesses’ with yoga and empowerment teaching, in particular aimed at women.

I have not read the book but I find Sierra’s weekly updates on the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual bodies very insightful. My in -box would be empty without her and I would like to meet her one day.

Number 3

http://www.brucelipton.com/

Bruce Lipton

Bruce is not a man who is afraid of ‘out of the box thinking’ and for this reason I could kiss him!

Even if you don’t share any of this maverick biologist’s research views you should check him out for sheer positive collective thinking.

It’s all down to experience at the end of the day. If you read this man’s research you may realise it’s NOT just down to your genes.

This man is the ultimate warrior for ‘Mind over matter’.

Number 4

http://www.energyarts.com/

Bruce Frantzis

Another Bruce on the warrior list, this time a real life martial warrior. Bruce’s blog updates are very much tai chi orientated but his life experience is well worth researching.

Bruce suffered severe back injury following a car accident and spent many years re-training his spine.

As a person who suffers from back pain myself I respect him for not only his immense skill, knowledge of Tai Chi and martial arts, but also as a survivor of back injury!

I found it necessary to read his books to really benefit from his experience and understand how he has overcome problems with – training. You don’t need to be doing tai chi to listen to his meditations which are available to download in some cases.

Number 5

http://epilepsytalk.com

Phylis Feiner Johnson

Everybody has their specialist subject and this lady is the ultimate ambassador for mine. I have not managed to find any other blogger with such a rich encyclopaedic knowledge of epilepsy. Phylis is using her life experience to educate and inform others about epilepsy. I only wish I could ship her to the UK to meet my consultant, because I think she knows more than he does.

Number 6

http://www.drfranklipman.com/big-pharma-define-better/

Dr Frank Lipman

Last but not least Dr Frank Lipman the newest addition to my inbox. Promoting alternative wellness on a grand scale in New York. This link is to his blog about ‘big pharma’.

Even though I do take medication, there is a good argument for all things in moderation.

It’s important that we don’t neglect the whole.

Without medication I would have seizures, but it is worth noting that even with medication if I neglect the whole body – Mental. Physical, Emotional and Spiritual then I get sick anyway.

Meditation is my medication.

It is important to keep learning about your body.

Don’t be blinded by science it hasn’t got all the answers.

It is important to look for ‘Back up’ and depending on what health condition ails you, your personal reading may lean towards specific health conditions. Facebook, twitter and specialist websites exist to take us to other people when we are not able to leave the house.

Get Googling!

Don’t be alone when you need help.

Get conneted, get smart, get empowered and get well!

Pushing The Boundaries – Epilepsy and Karate part 1

Wearing a Gi (karate suit) is a bit like going on camera because you gain a few pounds.
What on earth was I doing?
My first brush with a Dojo (Japanese martial training hall) was when I was 12. It was my good friend (or fiend depending on how you look at her) who thought it would be a good idea to go and train with or local karate club under Sensi Roger Sayce.
Roger was well loved by everybody who he taught and to this day I will never forget how every time he saw me he would ask when I was going to start training again.
So it didn’t last long.
Roger never gave up on me, if only he were alive today I would be able to tell him how much I now appreciate this and thank him.
There were a couple of reasons training came to an end. One was the distance and effort required to get to town for after school training (a mile to a milk stand outside a farm, 12 miles to town with my neighbour who was going training and her very kind dad who offered me lifts), Seizures and medication and also the grading examiner who was a bit scary. As a 12 year old I think I started shaking when he started shouting and shook all through the examinations – just two of them in two years. I was not brimming with confidence as a child and so I was quite happy to go and train without re-visiting grading’s (where you get a shiny new belt).
Mum and Dad were not enthused by my new found hobby and steadfastly refused to support me in my pursuit of ‘violence’. Unfortunately they missed the bit about fitness, discipline, confidence, self -defence, spirit, etc.
Eventually after a couple of years I stopped training at the level of temporary red belt or 8th Kyu.
Years passed and I declared I would start karate again ‘over my dead body’.
Time passed and my good friend married someone who also eat, slept and breathed karate. She and everyone else I started training with reached dizzying heights of ninja skills and I just got more and more sick.
And so, years later, I started karate training once more for a large number of reasons.
After being described by my friend’s husband as a ‘tai chi tree hugging hippie’ I thought I should check out the local club once more (pride in NO way played a part).
In all seriousness there are good reasons to train with people who seem to have turned out confident, self -assured, independent, assertive individuals. When faced with life’s problems they all seem to stand firmly in the face of adversity.

What did I have to loose?